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The Roman Inquisition

Centre versus Peripheries

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Edited by Katherine Aron-Beller and Christopher Black

In The Roman Inquisition: Centre versus Peripheries, two inquisitorial scholars, Black who has published on the institutional history of the Italian Inquisitions and Aron-Beller whose area of expertise are trials against Jews before the peripheral Modenese inquisition, jointly edit an essay collection that studies the relationship between the Sacred Congregation in Rome and its peripheral inquisitorial tribunals. The book analyses inquisitorial collaborations in Rome, correspondence between the Centre and its peripheries, as well as the actions of these sub-central tribunals. It discusses the extent to which the controlling tendencies of the Centre filtered down and affected the peripheries, and how the tribunals were in fact prevented by local political considerations from achieving the homogenizing effect desired by Rome.

Appeal to the People's Court

Rethinking Law, Judging, and Punishment

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Vincent Luizzi

In Appeal to the People’s Court: Rethinking Law, Judging, and Punishment, Vincent Luizzi turns to the goings on in courts at the lowest level of adjudication for fresh insights for rethinking these basic features of the legal order. In the pragmatic tradition of turning from fixed and unchanging conceptions, the work rejects the view of law as a set of black and white rules, of judging as the mechanical application of law to facts, and of punishment as a necessary, punitive response to crime. The author, a municipal judge and philosophy professor, joins theory and practice to feature the citizen in rethinking these institutions. The work includes a foreword by Richard Hull, special Guest Editor for this volume in Studies in Jurisprudence.

To Win and Lose a Medieval Battle

Nájera (April 3, 1367), A Pyrrhic Victory for the Black Prince

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Andrew Villalon and Donald Kagay

In To Win and Lose a Medieval Battle: Nájera (April 3, 1367). A Pyrrhic Victory for the Black Prince, L.J. Andrew Villalon and Donald J. Kagay provide a full treatment of one of the major battles of the Hundred Years War, which, perhaps because it was fought in Spain, is lesser known to scholars and general readers. Drawing information from contemporary European chronicles and the massive documentary collections of Spanish and French archives, the authors have painstakingly investigated the Iberian and European background events to Nájera and have in minute detail laid out how the army of Enrique II of Castile (assisted by Bertand de Guesclin) and that of his half-brother, Pedro I of Castile (assisted by Edward, the Black Prince), clashed at Nájera on April 3, 1367.

Winner of the 2019 Brigadier General James L. Collins Jr. Prize, awarded by the U.S. Commission on Military History for the best book on military history published in 2017 or 2018. The awarding committee praised the volume as ‘a genuinely original scholarly contribution... comprehensive, balanced, and insightful... this 600-page magnum opus will significantly enhance our understanding of military history during a seminal period of human development.’

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Ian Stuart Kelly

In Echoes of Success, Ian Stuart Kelly uses new information about late Victorian Scottish Highland battalions to provide new insights into how groups identify themselves, and pass that sense on to successive generations of soldiers.
Kelly applies concepts from organisational theory (the study of how organisations function) to demonstrate how soldiers’ experiences create a ‘blueprint’ of expected behaviours and thought patterns that contribute to their battalion’s continued success. This model manages the interplay between public perception and actual life experiences more effectively than current approaches to understanding identity. Also, Kelly’s primary research offers a more certain description of soldiers’ life, faith, education, and discipline than has previously been available.

Law and Division of Power in the Crimean Khanate (1532-1774)

With Special Reference to the Reign of Murad Giray (1678-1683)

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Natalia Królikowska-Jedlińska

The Crimean Khanate was often treated as a semi-nomadic, watered-down version of the Golden Horde, or yet another vassal state of the Ottoman Empire. This book revises these views by exploring the Khanate’s political and legal systems, which combined well organized and well developed institutions, which were rooted in different traditions (Golden Horde, Islamic and Ottoman). Drawing on a wide range of sources, including the Crimean court registers from the reign of Murad Giray (1678-1683), the book examines the role of the khan, members of his council and other officials in the Crimean political and judicial systems as well as the practice of the Crimean sharia court during the reign of Murad Giray.

The Hundred Years War (Part III)

Further Considerations

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Edited by L.J. Andrew Villalon and Donald J. Kagay

In this work, the third volume of essays dealing with many understudied aspects of the Hundred Years War, American, British, and European scholars deal with the varied sources that reveal the lives of soldiers in the conflict as well as the development of strategy and generalship in the many theaters of the war. The authors also focus on real heroes and villains of the conflict as well as the war’s impact on regions as scattered as Wales, the Low Countries, Italy, Scotland and Spain.
Contributors are Adrian Bell, Anne Curry, Adam Chapman, Andy King, David Simpkin, Christopher Candy, Donald Kagay, William Caferro, David Hoornstra, Elena Odio, Daniel Franke, David Green, Philip Morgan, Sean McGlynn, Wendy Turner, Andrew Villalon, Aleksandra Pfau, Kelly DeVries, and Sergio Boffa.

Winner of the 2014 Verbruggen Prize of De Re Militari (the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History) given annually for the best book on medieval military history.

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Jeannette Kamp

, despite the fact that the Jewish ghetto featured prominently in the world of stolen goods in early modern Frankfurt, it should not be characterised primarily as a black market for stolen items. Most of the trade in the Judengasse was legitimate and not dominated by fencing. Equally, there are no signs