Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,066 items for :

  • All: "black" x
  • History & Culture x

Sufism, Black and White

A Critical Edition of Kitāb al-Bayāḍ wa-l-Sawād by Abū l-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca.470/1077)

Series:

Edited by Bilal Orfali and Nada Saab

This critical Arabic text edition of K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād min khaṣāʾiṣ ḥikam al-ʿibād fī naʿt al-murīd wa-l-murād ("The Black and White in the Words of Wisdom by Bondsmen Describing the Seeker and the Mystic Quest"), a substantial handbook of early Sufism by Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. al-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca. 470/1077), is based on three manuscripts and is introduced by a detailed analytical study of the author and his work. The work is written in the tone of a guiding Sufi master and collects the mystical tradition of early Sufis in the form of anecdotes and concise aphorisms to instill guiding wisdom into the hearts of aspiring Sufi adepts. K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād forms an integral part of Sufi literature and is an essential source for the intellectual history of Islam until the middle of the 5th/11th century.

Andrew Robarts

” bromides concerning the geographical mien of Ottoman-Turkish history has been a recognition of and appreciation for the post-Cold War re-animation of Russian-Turkish relations in the Black Sea region. As scholars debate the historical markings and political legacy of the Ottoman empire, it is worth

Ahmad Fazlinejad and Farajollah Ahmadi

The Great Plague, generally known as the Black Death, swept many parts of the three continents of Asia, Africa and Europe in the mid-14th century repeatedly for decades and inflicted widespread demographical, social and economic consequences. Contrary to the common attitude of researchers in neglecting the spread of the Black Death in Iran during the 14th century and its relapse periods, findings of this study indicate that the Great Plague, which had numerous victims in Iran, mostly disrupted the country’s commercial relationships with the plague-stricken trade routes and centers. Moreover, due to the tragic consequences caused by the Black Death, Iran lost its position as one of the main routes in the international trade. In this study, based predominantly on historiographical sources in Persian and Arabic, Iran’s position in international trade in the era of Black Death is analyzed.

Series:

Yaacov Lev

Fatimid history is a chapter of both Mediterranean and Islamic history. In the period covered by the book (10th-12th centuries) profound changes took place in the Eastern Mediterranean affecting the history of the region.
Divided into three parts this study deals with the political history of the Fatimid period, the structure of the Fatimid state and the interplay between state and society.
The book is a contribution to the study of Islamic military history addressing such topics as: the formation and upkeep of black slave armies, the role of Christian-Armenian troops in twelfth-century Egypt and military and naval aspects of the Fatimid wars with the Crusaders. Other topics examined are the internal policies of the Fatimid state: notably, among them, the religious policies of the Fatimid regime, the involvement of the state in the urban life of the Fatimid capital city, Fustat-Cairo, and Fatimid attitudes toward non-Muslim communities.

Series:

Edited by Linda Komaroff

This publication offers a wide-ranging account of the Mongols in western and eastern Asia in the aftermath of Genghis Khan’s disruptive invasions of the early thirteenth century, focusing on the significant cultural, social, religious and political changes that followed in their wake. The issues considered concern art, governance, diplomacy, commerce, court life, and urban culture in the Mongol world empire as originally presented at a 2003 symposium at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and now distilled in this volume. This collection of 23 papers by many of the main authorities in the field demonstrates both the scope and the depth of the current state of Mongol-related studies and will undoubtedly inspire and provoke further research. The text is profusely illustrated by 30 color and 112 black-and-white illustrations.

Contributors are: Sheila S. Blair, Jonathan M. Bloom, Devin DeWeese, Teresa Fitzherbert, Bert G. Fragner, Robert Hillenbrand, Dietrich Huff, Ralph Kauz, Linda Komaroff, Dickran Kouymjian, Mark Kramarovsky, Donald P. Little, Charles Melville, David Morgan, Bernard O'Kane, Judith Pfeiffer, George Saliba, Noriyuki Shiraishi, Marianna Shreve Simpson, Eleanor Sims, John Masson Smith Jr., Abolala Soudavar, Oliver Watson and Elaine Wright.

Russian-Ottoman Relations Online, Part 2

Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853

• Number of titles: 120
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

This collection includes discussions of diplomatic treaties like those of Bucharest of 1812 and Adrianople (Edirne) of 1829; the commercial and military issue of access to the Black Sea; eye-witness accounts from war theaters; and plans for, and ideas about, future confrontations. The fact that many different perspectives are represented in this collection makes it extra attractive.

Series:

• Number of titles: 120
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available

This collection includes discussions of diplomatic treaties like those of Bucharest of 1812 and Adrianople (Edirne) of 1829; the commercial and military issue of access to the Black Sea; eye-witness accounts from war theaters; and plans for, and ideas about, future confrontations. The fact that many different perspectives are represented in this collection makes it extra attractive.

Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg more moderate publications.
• Number of titles: 193
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

Relations between the Ottoman Empire and Russia were no less conflictual in the eighteenth century: they were at war in 1736-39, 1768-74, and 1787. In the infamous Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca of 1774, the Ottomans were forced to acknowledge the independence of the Crimea (under Russian influence) and of the northern coasts of the Black Sea. It was not until the Treaty of Jassy in 1792 that peaceful relations between the Ottomans and the Russians were restored.

Islamic Art in the 19th Century

Tradition, Innovation, and Eclecticism

Series:

Edited by Doris Behrens-Abouseif and Stephen Vernoit

This collection of essays provides a timely reassessment of nineteenth-century Islamic art and architecture. The essays demonstrate that the arts of that era were vibrant and diverse, making ingenious use of native traditions and materials or adopting imported conventions and new technologies. However, traditionalists, revivalists and modernists all referred in one way or another to an Islamic heritage, whether to reinvent, revive or reject it.
Beginning with an historical introduction and an assessment of changing attitudes towards the visual arts the following essays provide case studies of architecture and art in Ottoman Turkey, Egypt, Morocco, sub-Saharan Africa, Iran, Central Asia, India and the Caribbean. They examine such issues as patronage, sources of artistic inspiration and responses to European art.
The essays have a relevance and importance for our understanding of the societies and attitudes of that time, and have a direct bearing on the more general debate concerning cultural identity and the integration of modern ideas in the Muslim world. The book is richly illustrated with very many illustrations in black-and-white and in full colour.