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Series:

Shank

Prophet Harris, The “Black Elijah” of West Africa offers the only comprehensive study of the thought of William Wade Harris, the Glebo (Liberia) loyalist whose prophetic mission from 1910-29 moved tens of thousands of West Africans out of traditional religion into the stream of Christianity and modernization, particularly in the Ivory Coast.
It reviews that unparalleled breakthrough, thoroughly examines traditional African, Western missionary and colonial influences which helped determine religious innovation and shape his vocation as prophet of Christ's reign of peace and prosperity. Heretofore unused sources, enriched by documents and photos, expose biblical eschatological and messianic dynamics which tied Harris' words, symbols and charisma together in a holistic African Christianity. The source of long-standing contentions between Ivoirian Harrists, Methodists and Catholics is uncovered in the well-intentioned but changing colonial and missionary responses to his impact.

Segregation and Singularity

Politics and its Context Among White, Middle-Class English-Speakers in Late-Apartheid Johannesburg

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Peter Stewart

As a political sociology of whites in the last years of apartheid in South Africa, this book provides an analysis of the social origins and social context of political attitudes among a sample of middle-class, English-speaking whites in selected suburbs in the city of Johannesburg, Gauteng Province. It reveals that such attitudes emanated in the context of acute and continuing political polarisation, principally between black and white, in the twilight of apartheid and before the first democratic elections.
The book adds another dimension to the interpretation of class dynamics in the study of apartheid South Africa. In contrast to other studies that have concentrated on the working class, and on very restricted political and economic elites – which gives an incomplete picture of class dynamics – this book considers the impact of the middle classes in shaping the history of apartheid South Africa.

Hear Our Voices

Race, Gender and the Status of Black South African Women in the Academy

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Edited by Reitumetse Obakeng Mabokela and Zine Magubane

This book has a twofold goal: first, the contributors aim to expose the racist and sexist practices that still suffuse the instutitional culture of South-African universities. Secondly, they seek to apply the alternative theoretical and methodological frameworks of black feminist thought. However particular their individual stories, this books offers rich material of interest to women scholars everywhere.

Sister Outsiders

The Representation of Identity and Difference in Selected Writings by South African Indian Women

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Devarakshanam Govinden

Sister outsiders draws attention to a neglected corpus of writing in South African literary criticism. The focus is on the exclusion of Indian women's writings in South Africa, which must be seen as a dimension of the larger exclusion of women's writings, white and black, from South African literature in general. The book provides an historical account of the events that contributed to the marginalisation of black literature - specifically Indian women's literature - amongst other things, the institutionalisation of English Studies which affected the reading and reception of texts written by Indian women, and the contstruction of an indigenous English literary tradition that did not include black writers as much as it did white writers of English descent, writing about South African experiences.

Making the Changes

Jazz in South African Literature and Reportage

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Michael Titlestad

Throughout its history, South African Jazz has been formed from complex transactions with other black Atlantic cultures, identities and political possibilities. Making the Changes considers jazz discourse from the legendary élan vital of the Sophiatown writers, through the King Kong reportage and 'white writing', to the agonised poetics of exile.

Voices that Reason

Theoretical Parables

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Ari Sitas

Voices that Reason is a path-breaking work. The author has charted the thoroughfares that speed the thought of many black South Africans towards specific expectations, grievances and actions. The present work constitutes an important and thought-provoking culmination of a generation's worth of disparate but related revisionist thinking within the social sciences and history of South Africa.

Strangers, Spirits, and Land Reforms

Conflicts about Land in Dande, Northern Zimbabwe

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Marja Spierenburg

This book describes efforts by the Zimbabwean government to enforce land reforms on African farmers in northern Zimbabwe. These efforts compounded rather than alleviated the problem of land scarcity for black small-scale farmers, a problem government now allegedly seeks to redress through invasions of white-owned farms. The book describes the similarities between the post-Independence land reforms and those attempted by the Rhodesian regime.
The land reforms in Dande rendered a considerable number of farmers officially landless. The book describes the resulting internal conflicts over land within the communities in Dande as well as the more concerted forms of resistance of these communities vis-a-vis the state. Attention is also given to the role the spirit mediums of the royal ancestors (Mhondoro) played in this resistance.

Heritage, Blackness and Afro-Cool

Styling Africanness in Amsterdam

Marleen de Witte

Introduction Who is an African? What does it mean to be African in Europe? Is African the same as Afro? Are black people automatically African? These questions are hotly debated among young people in Amsterdam today. On online discussion fora, Facebook pages, and blogs, and in