Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • All: "black" x
  • World Christianity x
  • Asian Studies x
Clear All

and a banishment outside of the English horizon of what almost unchangeably is called the ‘black fellows’” ( Kolff 1993 :638). But not many would go as far as Shore: he would go to annual fairs disguised as a native doctor so that he could hear what the people were talking about. 6 The Christian Faith

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

). To all appearances, this was a conflict between the lazy traditionalism of older staff members and the praiseworthy idealism of younger people. But it is not that black and white. Kittel did not give the impression that he was well acquainted with the sensitivities of the local culture that the older

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

to the Republic of India, are hardly part of pan-Indian culture. That was even less the case in Polo’s time, when the naked black tribes on these islands were viewed as extremely uncivilised. 4 Marco Polo wrote that they “were like wild beasts.” Their appearance contributed to his characterisation

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

from that point on referred to the Christian faith by the charming Indian term cattiyavētam ( satyaveda ), true knowledge. There were, however, Brahmins who continued to be bothered by his clothing, for the black soutane he wore was, in their view, inseparably associated with the paraṅgis . The

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

’s bountiful words to praise about her, he suddenly sees her true beauty and ornament, as if she is perfectly dressed and adorned. He looks upon her and praises her, realizing that her beauty is ever present because she thinks always of Rāma: The beauty of this black-eyed lady and the perfection of her

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

one replaces trousers with a dhoti , a black cassock with a saṃnyāsin ’s robe, the word “Bible” gives way to the “Veda,” “Messiah” to divya guru , and “salvation” to “reaching the farther shore,” and so on. For de Nobili, the higher truths of revelation conform to reason, and there was no

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

placed marvelous wooden images of serpents, lions, bears, tigers, stags and other animals, plus various kinds of birds; it had frames and curved arches. And on the car, a royal throne was placed; to it they added gold and silver laces, brown, red and black muslins and silken robes of diverse colors

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

their minds from within. He appears before the piraḷayākalar as a guru in Śaiva-form, four-armed, three-eyed, black-throated, and performing the three functions; 33 and he imparts knowledge. To the ignorant cakalar he reveals ñāṉam , concealing himself as a guru whose form is similar to theirs

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India