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Samuel Clark

” in the model. A fad may leave “offspring” in the form of practices that become a stable norm. This has given rise to an alternative natural analogy. In her study of food fashions in Early Modern England, Joan Thirsk was led to conclude that food history can best be “likened to the tides of the sea

Stephen Baskerville

offer, if not a unique, certainly an unusually vivid commentary on the symbolism of Calvinist religion, if not of Christianity itself, and its meaning for the political culture of early modern England.2 2 Despite academic attempts to devise more technical definitions, the trait for which the Puritans

Jeffrey Halley and David Sciulli

Modern England . London: Croom Helm. ——. 1987b. “Introduction: Th e Professions and Society in Early Modern England.” Pp. 1–24 in Prest (ed.). Th e Professions in Early Modern England . London: Croom Helm. ——. 1987c. “Lawyers.” Pp. 64–89 in Prest (ed.). Th e Professions in Early Modern England . London

David Sciulli

. “Introduction: Th e Professions and Society in Early Modern England.” Pp. 1–24 in Prest (ed.). Th e Professions in Early Modern England . London: Croom Helm. ——. 1991. “Judicial Corruption in Early Modern England.” Past & Present 133: 67–95. Pue, W. Wesley. 1997. “Lawyers and Political Liberalism in Eighteenth

Peter Schwartz

and thought may have rep- resented an attempt to build a bridge between this age and the socialist millen- nium to come. NOTES 1 On providential understandings of history in late medieval and early modern England, see Thomas 1971: 78-112. 2 Except when coupled with another reference, all subsequent