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Jean-Jacques Glassner

existants. Le foie, c’est-à-dire l’intérieur du corps 29 , le moteur de l’énergie vitale, le siège des émotions sensibles, qui avait pour correspondant le cœur comme siège du savoir, en offrait le reflet 30 . Hors le domaine de la divination, sans entrer dans un débat qui outrepasserait les limites de cet

At What is It That He Gazed?

Description and Focalization

Series:

Steve Vinson

valid for a relatively brief period of time, or indeed for only a moment, cannot be taken to imply that the feature thus indicated is not important; often fleetingly-true descriptions can be highly indicial. In Demotic fiction, descriptions of emotion not only tell us important things about the

An Unfathomable Snare of the Evil One

Discovery and Early Scholarly Reception (1867–1937)

Series:

Steve Vinson

Egyptian scribe see these points, and make his tale of one sort or the other? The answer seems obviously enough to be that he was not telling of any of these things or persons in particular. Human emotion, human life, was not his theme. He was, like his predecessors, telling of “strange things,” and it was

An Excellently Weird and Romantic Story

Earlier Popular Reception (1868–1932)

Series:

Steve Vinson

,” and whose Ayesha represented for him the “eternal feminine, the eternity of our emotions.” 55 Carl Jung invoked Haggard’s Ayesha repeatedly as a perfect embodiment of the fundamental feminine psychological and cultural principle that he called the “Anima.” 56 My strong impression is that there is no

Series:

Steve Vinson

and Agency: The role of the emotions in Demotic and earlier narratives,” in R. Nyord and A. Kølby (eds.), ‘Being in ancient Egypt’: Thoughts on Agency, Materiality and Cognition, Proceedings of the seminar held in Copenhagen, September 29–30, 2006 , BAR International Series 2019 (Oxford

The First Tale of Setne Khaemwas

Transliteration, Translation, and Commentary

Series:

Steve Vinson

. mt=f i̓rm ḥꜣṱ=f : Literally, “He spoke with his heart.” A literal translation would certainly be comprehensible in English, and would more closely correspond to the Egyptian mode of expression. However, for the Egyptians, the “heart” was the seat of both emotions and intellect. Because of the more

Series:

Laura Suzanne Lieber

of haste; each stanza is quickly overtaken by the next. In this respect, the poem reflects some of the difficult emotions of the mourners, who cling that much closer together in a time of grief, buffeted by a death that came too hastily, a life that moved on to its next stanza too quickly

Series:

Jennifer Andruska

For some time scholars have debated whether the Song of Songs has connections to the wisdom genre and how this changes our understanding of it. In Wise and Foolish Love in the Song of Songs, Jennifer Andruska shows that the influence of the wisdom genre on the Song is pervasive, running throughout the book, and offers an entirely new understanding of the book’s wisdom message. She demonstrates that the Song has combined elements of the ancient Near Eastern love song and wisdom genres to produce a wisdom literature about romantic love, inspiring readers to pursue a particular type of love relationship, modelled by the lovers throughout the poem, and aiming to transform them, through character formation, into wise lovers themselves.

Series:

J.L. Andruska

experience with a memorable choice of words. Those who have been in love truly know that love is as strong as death, jealousy as unyielding as the grave, and that it burns like an unquenchable mighty flame. Only a fool would awaken this type of powerful emotion for the wrong person, when the type of love

Series:

Elizabeth Agaiby

Discussing cognitive narratology, P.C. Hogan states that there are three typical narrative structures that arouse strong emotions for the audience: romantic, heroic and sacrificial. 18 We can deduce that the strong appeal of the Arabic Life for its audience may have been due to the fact that it contains