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Edited by James E. Ketelaar, Yasunori Kojima and Peter Nosco

The chapters in this volume variously challenge a number of long-standing assumptions regarding eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Japanese society, and especially that society’s values, structure and hierarchy; the practical limits of state authority; and the emergence of individual and collective identity. By interrogating the concept of equality on both sides of the 1868 divide, the volume extends this discussion beyond the late-Tokugawa period into the early-Meiji and even into the present. An Epilogue examines some of the historiographical issues that form a background to this enquiry. Taken together, the chapters offer answers and perspectives that are highly original and should prove stimulating to all those interested in early modern Japanese cultural, intellectual, and social history
Contributors include: Daniel Botsman, W. Puck Brecher, Gideon Fujiwara, Eiko Ikegami, Jun’ichi Isomae, James E. Ketelaar, Yasunori Kojima, Peter Nosco, Naoki Sakai, Gregory Smits, M. William Steele, and Anne Walthall.

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Roberta Strippoli

the lives of Chirenni and Ryōko, we get a sense of the strength of the emotions described in the Giō episode. The life story of the geisha, actress, and poet Takaoka Chishō, later turned Buddhist nun and abbess of Giōji, is a vivid example of how the Giō tale reflects real life and can appeal to

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Roberta Strippoli

sections of the Heike , its events take place for the most part indoors, in circumscribed domestic spaces. And yet, in its quiet way, Giō is a compelling story, a story of powerful emotions that once read is not forgotten, a story that begs to be retold. The longest episode in variants such as the

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

of both women, he wants Hotoke to perform alone. Giō expresses the desire to return to her home, but, unlike the version of the story in the Heike monogatari (where she showed strong emotion and wrote a poem on a sliding screen before leaving) she does not voice any disappointment at being rejected