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Tanya Riches

Australian Member of Parliament Pat Dodson (Dodson, Elston, and McCoy 2006). Pentecostalism was presented as a significantly revised popular Christianity with the potential to provide new theological contours for Indigenous peoples. In particular, various affective or “performative emotions” were found

Series:

Tanya Riches

, 319). In Aboriginal life, while the land mediates spirituality, performative emotions govern many of the spiritual practices from which the identity of the Yolngu peoples are crafted. Here Magowan (2007b, 62) enlightens that the Western dichotomy of the sacred and secular is not a feature of

Series:

Tanya Riches

do conversations. Collins (2004, 7) describes this as, “… mutually focused emotion and attention producing a momentarily shared reality, which thereby generates solidarity.” Thus, everything from rousing meetings to small daily interactions could be included. Importantly, rituals both effect and

Series:

Tanya Riches

the music crescendo-ed in volume, she shook. Her face was apparent with emotion. Pastor Edwards explained that God’s presence at Eagle Rock was powerful to address the anger felt by Aboriginal people. Garlett agreed, describing the worship time as an exchange, a “release of love [for] day

Series:

Tanya Riches

through the rituals of an organization, this changes their emotional energy. Within this theory, similar emotions are rehearsed in all rituals of the same institution ( Collins 2004 , 132). Therefore, gains in emotional energy from larger, or more successful gatherings are rehearsed in smaller rituals at

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Tanya Riches

outline the ideal emotional response at each site. For example, one participant at Ganggalah described how her husband cries in communion time due to thankfulness for Christ’s sacrifice. She admitted that while she had not yet experienced emotion that deep, she indeed desired to do so. This indicates the

Series:

Tanya Riches

youth’s emotions that increased the success of Nintiringanyi programs. Workers reiterated this. Steve Tofa: Shame culture… it’s huge… we even had a few programs here where we teach them to go into the shop and talk to the shop keeper because they’re too shy, you know, [and] they get shamed… what we try

Series:

Joanna Cruickshank and Patricia Grimshaw

parade, when they caught sight of ‘the infant and hapless offspring of their deceased friends.’ These women’s tears, which the writer believed he could interpret through a shared language of emotion, could equally be seen as grief at the loss of these children’s parents. Rather than ‘British benevolence