Postscript

Contemporary Urban Life in Seoul and Taipei

Series:

Jina E. Kim

days ought not to be denied.” 13 The narrator is certainly nostalgic and even resigned as she looks at her old neighborhood from a temporal distance. These emotions, however, are not ones in which she indulges in the colonial past but ones that analytically scrutinize how the present deals with the

Discovering Modernity

Sketching Urban Landscapes of Home and Abroad

Series:

Jina E. Kim

women, are also of such little significance to the narrator that they do not stir extreme emotions of either excitement or disgust but only a certain strange curiosity. Even though the narrator encounters a pair of dogs mating in the middle of the street, he describes the scene as “like boredom itself

Linguistic Modernity

New Words on the Streets and Modernist Poetry

Series:

Jina E. Kim

balance between intellectualism and emotion. Therefore, according to Kim Uch’ang, “it [ Weather Chart ] is no more than a collection of extremely superficial and fashionable abstractions.” 57 Recent scholarship which situates Kim’s poetry in the context of colonial modernity tends to evaluate his works

Visual Modernity

Screening Women in Colonial Media

Series:

Jina E. Kim

American ads. Silverberg suggests that Oya Soichi’s comment on Japanese modernity being without “emotions, morals, or ideals—all contours and not content,” could provide a possible answer. 47 Another factor that distinguishes the cartoonist from the archivist and the capitalist is that the cartoonist is

Series:

Zev Handel

conventionally associated pronunciations and meanings. An example is 忄, an allographic combining form of 心 (which writes xīn ‘heart’); it functions as a taxographic semantic element in many compound graphs that write morphemes with meanings related to cognition and emotion, such as 恨 hèn ‘hate’. Other