Series:

Michael Glover

’ biological discrepancies ‘show us a different world.’ 14 In thinking about how animals experience the world, we are aided by some grasp of their physiologies and their emotions. Insights from disciplines like zoology, ethology, linguistics, ecology, psychology, and animal welfare science, for example, can

Series:

Harry Wels

, persons, and agents of change in their own right. They took and take ‘animal subjectivities’ seriously: ‘she or he is regarded as an individual, sentient being who experiences emotions, who, possibly, enacts morality, who has agency, intentionality, a sense of the teleology of her or his life, as well as

Series:

Jan-Bart Gewald

, their clear and consistently demonstrated care and affection for their young, their intelligence, their social interactions that include fun and games, and their emotions and fears. All of these attributes serve to ensure that baboons are more than merely creatures; they are a mirror for ourselves as

Series:

Jan-Bart Gewald, Marja Spierenburg and Harry Wels

place the animals that are being written about and dealt with in the discussion at the centre of the analysis, that is, as sentient beings with feeling, emotion, and empathy. Still, central to the academic and popular dialogue surrounding conservation in southern Africa is a discourse of morality. The