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Emotion, Violence, Vengeance and Law in the Middle Ages

Essays in Honour of William Ian Miller

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Edited by Kate Gilbert and Stephen D. White

Contributions to this Festschrift for the renowned American legal and literary scholar William Ian Miller reflect the extraordinary intellectual range of the honorand, who is equally at home discussing legal history, Icelandic sagas, English literature, anger and violence, and contemporary popular culture. Professor Miller's colleagues and former students, including distinguished academic lawyers, historians, and literary scholars from the United States, Canada, and Europe, break important new ground by bringing little-known sources to a wider audience and by shedding new light on familiar sources through innovative modes of analysis.
Contributors are Stuart Airlie, Theodore M. Andersson, Nora Bartlett, Robert Bartlett, Jordan Corrente Beck, Carol J. Clover, Lauren DesRosiers, William Eves, John Hudson, Elizabeth Papp Kamali, Kimberley-Joy Knight, Simon MacLean, M.W. McHaffie, Eva Miller, Hans Jacob Orning, Jamie Page, Susanne Pohl-Zucker, Amanda Strick, Helle Vogt, Mark D. West, and Stephen D. White.

The Human Sausage Factory

A Study of Post-War Rumour in Tartu

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Eda Kalmre

Under certain conditions, some rumours, which were established as part of folklore already long ago, may become fixed in the memory and the subconscious of several generations. This is what happened with the rumour about a human sausage factory after the Second World War. In Tartu, Estonia, this rumour obtained a symbolic meaning and power due to the politics of the totalitarian Soviet regime. The memories of the post-war period are still vivid in the collective mind, and the onetime rumour of sausage factories incorporates the population’s tensions, pain, loss, choices, defiance and irreconcilability. The individual and community emotions that are brought to a focus in this discourse are an indicator of defining social boundaries and behaviour, of ‘us’ and ‘them’. When describing the events that took place in Tartu, folklore becomes a powerful tool with which to construe the meaning of the era at the social level.
Through documents, photos and people’s memories, the book offers an insight into the city of Tartu after the Second World War and reveals the several layers of meaning represented by rumour in this period.

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Simon Halink

travel companions, the girl Röskva and the boy Þjálfi, are interpreted as metaphors for physicality/emotions and vitality, respectively. Loki, the mischievous shape-shifter that accompanies Thor on many a journey, would then symbolise the earthly body, which is already “conceived” the moment a soul

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Gylfi Gunnlaugsson

literature stems, in Grímur’s view, from a specific Nordic trait: the people of the Nordic nations are better able than the Greeks to restrain their emotions, and thus they have greater determination and tenacity. The Nordic type is easily able to postpone exacting revenge, and will take action later, when

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Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

uses very strong and self-confident expressions about not caring what his family or the world would say. It appears as if the 1930 translator does not like this. 4 Censoring Female Emotions Unexpectedly, there are also significant parts missing from the descriptions of Elizabeth and Darcy’s love for

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Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

uses very strong and self-confident expressions about not caring what his family or the world would say. It appears as if the 1930 translator does not like this. 4 Censoring Female Emotions Unexpectedly, there are also significant parts missing from the descriptions of Elizabeth and Darcy’s love for

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Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

temptation to improve Jane Austen’s love story by supplying more emotions than the author does. Lalli Knutsen adds to the meetings between Elizabeth and Darcy, and also Jane and Bingley’s, and amplifies the romance. She makes Mr Darcy’s early admiration of Elizabeth far more romantic in expression: he speaks

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Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

could see that it was really Mr Bingley arriving, and that he even was accompanied by Darcy. She shyly withdrew from the window and sat down beside Jane”. 26 Here, Austen herself is sparse as if to emphasize emotions too tense for words: she looked – she saw – she sat down. The translator is more