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Lena Lämmle, Elizabeth Stephens, Ulrike Nett, Markus Dresel, Thomas Götz, Reinhard Pekrun and Anne Frenzel

Edited by Thomas Götz

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Alberto Bellocchi, Kathy Mills, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny and Jordan Mckenzie

. Emotions such as fear, worthlessness and being sick in the stomach are not uncommon and some teachers have begun collecting undesirable experiences in web-logs 1 . Public disclosures about traumatic circumstances of teachers’ work reveal the highly emotional nature of the job. They may also represent a

Anne Chodakowski and Kieran Egan

Let's Call it What it is: A Matter of Conscience

A New Vocabulary for Moral Education

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Beryl W. Holtam

With a new century, there has emerged a new age in moral considerations. The Arab Spring, Facebook, and the Occupy Movement all point to an awareness of, and concern for, the moral character of the individual and the collective. The phrase, “it’s the right thing to do”, echoing throughout news media and one’s daily exchanges, typically indicates a moral positioning. Presented in this book is the argument that now is the time to call it what it is, a matter of conscience, and to embrace the transformative power of a new vocabulary for moral and character education.

In a more expansive approach than typically seen, this book examines the nature and function of conscience. Building upon the foundational work of Thomas Green (1999), the vocabulary of reflexive judgment, reflexive emotions, normation, and voices of conscience, are explored as they apply to moral formation, with examples and applications provided. Specific attention is given to the interrelationship of the collective conscience with democracy. Educating for conscience and the notion of the sacred are also examined. Written from an educator’s perspective, this book offers a framework for moral education to both the secular and religious domains.

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Edited by Lynn A. Bryan and Kenneth Tobin

Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education contains 16 chapters written by 32 authors from 11 countries. The book is intended for a broad audience of teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policymakers. Interesting perspectives, challenging problems, and fresh solutions grounded in cutting edge theory and research are presented, interrogated, elaborated and, while retaining complexity, offer transformative visions within a context of political tensions, historical legacies, and grand challenges associated with Anthropocene (e.g., sustainability, climate change, mass extinctions).

Within overarching sociocultural frameworks, authors address diverse critical issues using rich theoretical frameworks and methodologies suited to research today and a necessity to make a difference while ensuring that all participants benefit from research and high standards of ethical conduct. The focus of education is broad, encompassing teaching, learning and curriculum in pre-k-12 schools, museums and other informal institutions, community gardens, and cheeseworld. Teaching and learning are considered for a wide range of ages, languages, and nationalities. An important stance that permeates the book is that research is an activity from which all participants learn, benefit, and transform personal and community practices. Transformation is an integral part of research in science education.

Contributors are: Jennifer Adams, Arnau Amat, Lucy Avraamidou, Marcília Elis Barcellos, Alberto Bellocchi, Mitch Bleier, Lynn A. Bryan, Helen Douglass, Colin Hennessy Elliott, Alejandro J. Gallard Martínez, Elisabeth Gonçalves de Souza, Da Yeon Kang, Shakhnoza Kayumova, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Ralph Levinson, Sonya N. Martin, Jordan McKenzie, Kathy Mills, Catherine Milne, Ashley Morton, Masakata Ogawa, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny, Chantal Pouliot, Leah D. Pride, Anton Puvirajah, S. Lizette Ramos de Robles, Kathryn Scantlebury, Glauco S. F. da Silva, Michael Tan, Kenneth Tobin, and Geeta Verma.

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Ruiz Xicoténcatl Martínez

Polysemic What elements make up the unconventional educational ideal of the poet? What relationship exists between poetry, education and emotions? What is educational poetics founded upon? How does poetic creation merge with educational purposes? The answers to my questions can be found in various