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James P. Davis and Alberto Bellocchi

Emotion research is now a well-established and expanding sub-field of science education research ( Bellocchi, Quigley, & Otrel-Cass, 2017 ). Despite some early efforts in the study of affect (e.g., Alsop, 2005 ), a more general construct than emotion, the field of science education has taken

Constance Duncombe

emerging changes in public diplomacy practice, we must pay greater attention to the role of emotions in facilitating these transformations. Social media platforms enable emotions that can work towards the development of trust between actors, or undermine previously stable diplomatic relationships. Why is

Constance Duncombe

emerging changes in public diplomacy practice, we must pay greater attention to the role of emotions in facilitating these transformations. Social media platforms enable emotions that can work towards the development of trust between actors, or undermine previously stable diplomatic relationships. Why is

Edited by Halvor Eifring

Do all cultures and historical periods have a concept corresponding to the English word emotion? This collection of essays is concerned with the closest candidate within the Chinese language, namely the term qíng. What is the meaning of this term in different periods and genres? What are the types of discourse in which it is typically found? This volume contains two essays on the notion of qíng in classical sources, two on Chan Buddhist usage, and two on fiction and drama from the Ming and Qing dynasties. An introductory essay discusses the complex historical development of the term. Together, the essays may be read as a first step towards a conceptual history of one of the key terms in traditional Chinese culture.

Rafael Walthert

communities, analyzing an Evangelical church based in Switzerland. It is argued here that the main factor leading to this success are the communal rituals and that emotion is a central category for the understanding of the way these rituals function. In a first step, a general theory of emotion and ritual is

Katie Barclay

This introduction to the special issue on ‘Emotions and Change’ introduces the main theories of the role of emotion in processes of social and political change, as well as how emotion is theorised to change over time. It introduces the articles within this issue as part of this literature, highlighting how they contribute and extend the field, notably in their discussion of ambivalence and stasis as part of movement.

Katie Barclay

A key question for historians of emotion has been the relationship between the expression of emotion and the corporeal experience of emotion by historical subjects. Recently, work indebted to practice and performance theories has emphasised language’s productive capacities to produce emotion performatively. New Materialism extends this conversation by suggesting an alternative imagining of ‘matter’ – the corporeal – which attributes it greater agency in systems of discursive production. This article explores in particular the work of theorist Karen Barad and the implications of her work for the history of emotions.

Series:

Edited by Barbara Schuler

In Historicizing Emotions: Practices and Objects in India, China, and Japan, nine Asian Studies scholars offer intriguing case studies of moments of change in community or group-based emotion practices, including emotionally coded objects. Posing the questions by whom, when, where, what-by, and how the changes occurred, these studies offer not only new geographical scope to the history of emotions, but also new voices from cultures and subcultures as yet unexplored in that field. This volume spans from the pre-common era to modern times, with an emphasis on the pre-modern period, and includes analyses of picturebooks, monks’ writings, letters, ethnographies, theoretic treatises, poems, hagiographies, stone inscriptions, and copperplates. Covering both religious and non-religious spheres, the essays will attract readers from historical, religious, and area studies, and anthropology.
Contributors are: Heather Blair, Gérard Colas, Katrin Einicke, Irina Glushkova, Padma D. Maitland, Beverley McGuire, Anne E. Monius, Kiyokazu Okita, Barbara Schuler.

Meri-Anna Elina Hintsala

Emotions have been interpreted as a social glue and as a vital foundation for active internet discussions as well as lived bodily experiences. In this article, I will analyse emotional expressions that are based on a teaching of rejecting contraceptives in the Finnish revival movement Conservative Laestadianism (CL). The emotions are expressed through internet discussions in autobiographical narrations, which are analysed qualitatively. The article illustrates three emotional positions in relation to the teaching on contraception – believers, doubters and surrenderers – as a part of a religious emotional regime. I will argue that context and meaning of emotions are significant in order to understand them as part of a religious system, and the embeddedness of emotions should be taken into account when analysing emotions on the internet.

Managing Emotions

Outcomes of a Breathing Intervention in Year 10 Science

Series:

Donna King, Maryam Sandhu, Senka Henderson and Stephen M. Ritchie

, Maryam Sandhu and Ben Boland (2017) conducted a study in a middle-years science classroom that showed managing students’ emotions is necessary because negative emotions such as frustration and anxiety can impact negatively on students’ learning, concentration, and confidence to persist with challenges