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Eric Dodson-Robinson

in response to trauma and the collapse of social order. The mirror stage and the imaginary order it establishes are fraught with antagonistic, rending impulses and emotions. The discrepancy between ideal image and fragmentary, traumatic experience stimulates not only tension between the two, but also

Series:

Eric Dodson-Robinson

dramatizes that what is at stake in acceding to the impetus of another’s emotions is one’s very self. Finally, I outline how the early biographers and historians portray Nero, whom Seneca served as tutor and advisor, as an Atreus-like figure. This Nero models his own crimes on those of the past, which he

Series:

Tianshu Yu

Translator Haiying Liu

analyzed. Hence, I focus on the queen’s starring role and her significance in the play. The Peacock’s Gallbladder is not verbose in creating Queen Hudijin’s image, but portrays a lamentable figure embracing sophisticated emotions and inner struggles briefly and vividly, in the way of Springs and

Series:

Eric Dodson-Robinson

when she begs Titus to spare her son. She appeals to emotion in her tears of “passion for her son” (1.1.106); she compares Titus’s love for his own sons to her love for Alarbus (1.1.107–08), evoking the most basic hereditary ties; she appeals to his respect for Alarbus’s virtue as a soldier in his

Series:

Sari Kawana

them by the mentalities, emotions, and backgrounds of the Japanese who made them. Then, through these many examples, we can tease out the wonderful latent potential hidden within the Japanese people. 53 The expression ‘latent potential’ suggests that the Japanese do not need to produce anything ‘new

Series:

Jinyu Liu

highest good), and de were set in the classic Aristotelian formulation of to meson : ‘to experience these emotions at the right times and on the right occasions and towards the right persons and for the right causes and in the right manner is the mean or the supreme good, which is characteristic of