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stripped of their Eurocentric contents. Stump describes two deconstructive tactics used by “minority religions” (i.e. religions that do not have hegemonic power in a particular region) to protect themselves from the more powerful majority. One is a return to fundamentalism with a claim to purity of faith

In: Social Sciences and Missions

interpretation of authoritative rules and regulations into their application to social circumstances, or the way in which the machinery of the state creates, promotes, and reinforces certain narratives about social groups, produces space within which the hegemonic power is reinforced and reproduced. This

In: Journal of Law, Religion and State

dominance of Christianity, its relationship with the establishment of colonial power, and its creation of educated elites gave the modernist assumptions about intervening in local societies and the pursuit of new projections of the future almost hegemonic power (Comaroff and Comaroff 1997 ). To be more

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

established scholars have lost part of their ‘ Deutungshegemonie ’, their ‘hegemonic power of interpretation and de fi nition’, as translators, as well as their exclusive social role as religious experts and intermediaries of religious and sacred knowledge in the processes of modernization mentioned above

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

- nections with European influence, portraying the Setswana Bible as a form of ‘linguistic colonialism’ that compelled Batswana to adopt European modes of discourse. 1 Th eir view arises in concordance with prevailing scholarship on the hegemonic power of cultural norms over the agency of individuals, and

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

hegem- ony, the “order of signs and practices” that “come to be taken-for-granted as the natural and received shape of the world.” 27 Where ideologies are open to contestation, hegemonic power – because it seems to exist beyond human agency, and above controversy – is by defi nition silent. In the

In: Social Sciences and Missions

rituals and peacemaking dialogues of People-to-People Peacemaking revived the authority of indigenous leaders, increased the political prestige of church leaders, and challenged the hegemonic power of rebel leaders who employed authority in a violent and statelike fashion. After discussing the fourth

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

-13 June 2004’. BZS Zimbabwe Review Issue 04/3, August 2004. Ranger, T., & M. Ncube. 1995. ‘Religion and War in Southern Matabeleland’, in N. Bhebe & T. Ranger (eds.), Soldiers in Zimbabwe’s Liberation War . Harare: University of Zimbabwe & London: James Currey. Roseberry, W. 1996. ‘Hegemony, Power, and

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

eventual discovery that “they” indeed had religions just like “us” to have been a triumph but would have seen this judgment instead as evidence of the tremendous victory of the European map of the world! That is to say, there may be no better evidence of the success of a hegemonic power than what we find

In: Religion and Theology

Paul. 28 It should be noted that Brueggemann, like others, is uneasy about the term metanarrative because he does not want to engage in reductionism by denying the plurality, diversity, and fragmented quality of the Old Testament text. 29 He is also, in line with Lyotard, suspicious of the hegemonic

In: Religion and Theology