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the Cold War” (p. 255). 9 While it remains unclear what the ultimate outcome might be of growing competition and conflict between the United States and China, it is very clear that the US is a dying empire with declining hegemonic power in the world. Whether that hegemonic power is replaced is an

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

often fail to interrogate the hegemonic power structures that have precipitated the contemporary crises of civilization—including, but not limited to, the ecological crisis, which has featured the rise of global temperatures, desertification, sea-level rise, biodiversity loss, and other extreme

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

capitulates to the presumption that communism is a “European thing” and thus inherently alien to the indigenous communities, and that evidence of its influence on them is therefore something to be denied or explained away. Here we run into the hegemonic power of anti-communism and its ideological influence

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

the field as the hegemonic power of feminist empiricism has waned. For empiricist researchers, a major purpose was to correct gender bias in dominant research prac- tices, while remaining steadfastly loyal to the empiricist tradition. As epistemologi- cal alternatives penetrated various social science

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

pictured as a country that is “bound to lead” the world political economy, just as it leads global anti-terrorist efforts (Nye 1990). International trade, according to a number of neorealist studies, is inexorably linked to the national security imperatives of the hegemonic power (Gowa 1993). China

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

—from IFIs and INGOs, whether in the form of hegemonic power (Krasner 1996; Strange 1994) or by learn- ing from international institutions and transnational actors (Barnett and Finnemore 2004; Koh 1996). Regardless of the mechanism—increased firm- level influence or increased pressure from international actors

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

China is replacing the us as a hegemonic power in the region, Jenkins ( 2012 ) concludes that there are none, since neither Chinese fdi inflows, nor stock in Latin America in 2010 even reached 1 per cent of the region’s total. “In terms of fdi , China’s role in the region continues to be marginal

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

importance of Okinawa, Johnson ( 2000 ) writes, “It is used to project American power throughout Asia in the service of a de facto U.S. grand strategy to perpetrate or increase American hegemonic power in this crucial region” (Pg. 64). Under the familiar guise of promoting democracy, Washington set up a

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

quickly mark an event as being of world-historical significance. At the time, the fall of the Soviet Union must surely have felt like the end of history. Will scholars hold onto this view for another twenty or thirty years? Or take the hegemonic power of the United States. To some, it seems essential to

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

through catch-up industrialization and development. Th e competition was won by the US, which after World War II became the new hegemonic power in the world economy. In the last decades of the twentieth century, US hegemony was challenged by the rising European Union (EU) and the successful

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology