Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • All: "hegemonic power" x
  • 19th & 20th Century Philosophy x
Clear All
Author: Lorenzo Fusaro

. This may be a ‘signal crisis’ (characterised by the loss of supremacy in production) or the subsequent ‘terminal crisis’ of a hegemonic power, associated with the collapse of what Arrighi refers to as the ‘ belle époque ’, which has historically characterised a hegemonic power’s financial expansion. As

In: Revisiting Gramsci’s Notebooks

, Subalternity between Pre-modernity and Modernity , casts new light on the concept of the ‘subaltern’, interpreting the latter as exploited and as included, albeit ‘passively’, within hegemonic power structures (Thomas). While Freeland provides the reader with a combined analysis of Gramsci’s categories of

In: Revisiting Gramsci’s Notebooks
Author: Peter D. Thomas

to minor and fleeting roles. In this conception, the subalterns are not comprehended simply as the oppressed or dominated, in an abstract and transhistorical sense; rather, they are actively incorporated in an historically specific system of hegemonic power, in forms of passive citizenship just as

In: Revisiting Gramsci’s Notebooks

with Germany’s military triumph. No, a new, more ambitious and harder task awaited the Second Reich, which had become the hegemonic power in continental Europe: The German will be able to appear worthy of honour and as a bringer of salvation in the eyes of other nations if he can show that he is

In: Nietzsche, the Aristocratic Rebel

, especially at such crucial moments as that in which Prussia and Germany confronted the militarily hegemonic power of continental Europe, the country of ‘civilisation’ and modern subversion. The Dionysiac also responded to this need. It was the moment of choral unity, or of ‘superior community’, as we have

In: Nietzsche, the Aristocratic Rebel