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Author: Rita Lucarelli

ambiguity when considering its occurrences in other works. 3 One issue in the ontological characterization of demons, both in Egyptian and Greek thought, concerns their physicality. In Egyptian funerary compositions many demons have bodies, generally of hybrid nature. The same can be seen in the

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Seth Sanders

of ethnic purity on which other contemporary scholarly articles of his were based. While von Soden survived this attempted “exposure” of his hybrid Jewish-infl uenced scholarship, his teacher Landsberger fl ed for his life to Ankara and then Chicago. 11 And it was this very migration of German Near

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Y. S. Chen

chronological timescale. The catastrophe was eventually regarded as the climactic event that partitioned early world history into the antediluvian era and the postdiluvian era. 7 (5) Convergence of traditions: Mythological and chronographic traditions related to the Flood converged in certain hybrid

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Margo Kitts

, the lion of the deep (Wyatt 2005 :190–91). In 3rd millennium Akkadian iconography it is a serpent with seven heads; 10 its heads are plural too in Psalm 74:13. 11 Along with various hybrid creatures (e.g., griffins, 12 serpent-birds, lion-serpents, all on seals), sea monsters and riotous waters

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: YITZHAQ FEDER

conventional description of deities punishing the transgressor, these texts personify the oaths as if they autonomously enforce them- selves. Alongside this linguistic convention, one finds a scribal conven- tion involving the use of the hybrid Sumero-Akkadogram N Ī Š DINGIR MEŠ . It would appear that this

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

by sensory input derived from reading or hearing the texts under scrutiny. In both cases we may have integration networks that are single-, double-, or multiple-scope, with a potentially infinite number of input spaces. Moreover, since they are all mental spaces, we may also have hybrid integration

In: Matthew’s Non-Messianic Mapping of Messianic Texts

corpus, creating a “hybrid figure” as the speaker ( Meaning and Context in the Thanksgiving Hymns: Linguistic and Rhetorical Perspectives on a Collection of Prayers from Qumran ( EJL ; Atlanta: SBL Press, 2015), esp. 270–75). 40 Emile Puech, “Resurrection: The Bible and Qumran” in The Bible and the

In: Matthew’s Non-Messianic Mapping of Messianic Texts
Editor / Translator: Joan E. Taylor

. 21 likewise the term is used to insist that women wear women’s clothing as much as men wear men’s. In Her . 274 Philo speaks of the soul that comes down from heaven and resists the lures of the body—unlike some hybrid androgyne or gynandro (ἀνδρόγυνος or γύνανδρος) thereby associating the categories

In: Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life
Author: Brett Maiden

1 Introduction The demons Pazuzu and Lamaštu are among the most fantastic and frightening creatures from ancient Mesopotamia. From a conceptual point of view, they are also among the most complex. As hybrid creatures, the appearance of each figure combines an impressive array of

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
Author: Ido Koch

, “Introduction;” P. Van Dommelen, “Colonial Interactions and Hybrid Practices: Phoenician and Carthaginian Settlement in the Ancient Mediterranean,” in The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters , ed. G. J. Stein, 109–141; idem, “Colonialism and Migration in the Ancient Mediterranean,” Annual Reviews 41 (2012

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions