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an isolated sphere but part of a network of connections developing simultaneously with other civilizations throughout history. It is in the realm of such interconnections that syncretic or hybrid (Bhabha 2012; Burke 2010) creative processes take place, as new cultural and religious identities

In: Asian Review of World Histories

This essay interrogates the category of the ‘global’ in the emerging domain of ‘global intellectual history.’ Through a case study of the Indian social-religious reformer Rammohun Roy (1772/4-1833), I argue that notions of global selfhood and rights-consciousness (which have been preoccupying concerns of recent debates in intellectual history) have multiple conceptual and practical points of origin. Thus in early colonial India a person like Rammohun Roy could invoke centuries-old Indic terms of globality (vishva, jagat, sarva, sarvabhuta, etc.), selfhood (atman/brahman), and notions of right (adhikara) to liberation/salvation (mukti/moksha) as well as late precolonial discourses on ‘worldly’ rights consciousness (to life, property, religious toleration) and models of participatory governance present in an Indo- Islamic society, and hybridize these with Western-origin notions of rights and liberties. Thereby Rammohun could challenge the racial and confessional assumptions of colonial authority and produce a more deterritorialized and non-sectarian idea of selfhood and governance. However, Rammohun’s comparativist world-historical notions excluded other models of selfhood and globality, such as those produced by devotional Vaishnava, Shaiva, and Shakta-Tantric discourses under the influence of non-Brahmanical communities and women. Rammohun’s puritan condemnation of non-Brahmanical sexual and gender relations created a homogenized and hierarchical model of globality, obscuring alternate subaltern-inflected notions of selfhood. Class, caste, and gender biases rendered Rammohun supportive of British colonial rule and distanced him from popular anti-colonial revolts and social mobility movements in India. This article argues that today’s intellectual historians run the risk of repeating Rammohun’s biases (or those of Hegel’s Weltgeschichte) if they privilege the historicity and value of certain models of global selfhood and rights-consciousness (such as those derived from a constructed notion of the ‘West’ or from constructed notions of various ‘elite’ classicized ‘cultures’), to the exclusion of models produced by disenfranchised actors across the world. Instead of operating through hierarchical assumptions about local/global polarity, intellectual historians should remain sensitive to and learn from the universalizable models of selfhood, rights, and justice produced by actors in different spatio- temporal locations and intersections.

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Author: Sze Hang Choi
Focusing on the hybrid maritime world of Hong Kong, Pearl River Delta and West River in the last two decades of the late Qing period, this work tells a vivid trading and competition story of previously unknown private Chinese traders and junk masters. This challenges the prevailing view of the domination of China’s maritime trade by modern foreign steamships. Making use of unpublished Kowloon Maritime Customs and British diplomatic records in the late 19th and early 20th century, Henry Sze Hang Choi convincingly shows how these private Chinese traders flexibly adopted to the foreign-dominated maritime customs agencies and treaty port system in defending their Chinese homeland stronghold against the invasion of foreign economic power.
Author: Ong Soon Keong

honors. Lim thus represented what a self-made man could achieve within the colonial system in Singapore and he was deeply appreciative of what British rule had offered him. 3.2 Hybrid Identity Even though Straits Chinese were officially recognized as a sub-category of Chinese in Singapore

In: China and Asia
Author: Tom Marling

tourist trinkets in Ningbo finds that while they superficially “offered visual validation to those who regarded China as a place of unremitting toil and Oriental cruelty” (232), they were also works of indigenous handicraft – appropriately hybrid objects for the hybrid space of the treaty port. While

In: China and Asia

Chinese had never actually “left” China because of these “corridors.” Ong argues that Lim Boon Keng was secure with his racial hybridity and his identity as an overseas Chinese, and that it was in response to the changing socio-economic conditions in Singapore that he acknowledged Chinese culture and

In: China and Asia

The 3-dimensional (3D) animated cartoon entitled Hanuman Chansamon is a presentation of the Ramakian in popular culture style. Cultural hybridity and dynamics make this cartoon appealing for closer investigation. The analysis reveals that hybrid features in Hanuman Chansamon can be categorized into two groups--“omnipresent hybrid feature” and “fractional hybrid feature.” Omnipresent hybrid features are those that can be perceived throughout the show while fractional hybrid features exist in some specific components. The sole yet prominent omnipresent hybrid feature is the blend of traditional story and modern presentation technology. Fractional hybrid features are the co-existence of old-new cultural elements as well as local-global cultural elements which can be found in several components including the overture, dialogues, motifs, characters, and settings. Dynamic features in Hanuman Chansamon include new meaning and emphasis, new behavioral traits of some characters, change in language form from verse to prose, and adaptive eulogy to teachers (bòtwâaykhruu). The commercial purpose and the production policies of this animated cartoon are two significant factors leading to the emergence of cultural hybridity and dynamic features.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities
Author: Ellen Hsieh

’ Western owners than the Asian artists. Part 3 is entitled “Hybrid Aesthetics.” Chapter 8, “The Global Keyboard: Music, Visual Forms, and Maritime Trade in the Early Modern Era,” by Victoria Lindsay Levine, discusses the circulation and exchange of music between social elites in the East and the West

In: Asian Review of World Histories

the Northern Province of Portuguese India, it was geographically distant from Goa and from the nearest artistic production center, Bassein. The author demonstrates that this circumstance led to the development of particular features in the local Catholic architecture and art, as well as hybrid

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Author: Radhika Seshan

hybridity and selective permeability (which in turn is shaped by historical factors) is also a trope that could have been used, in addition to the existing ones of encounter and hybrid or local environmental knowledge. Finally, there needs to be more research on the transmission of knowledge within the

In: Asian Review of World Histories