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through various hybridity models, each of which recognizes that hybridity is not the simple mixing of once separate and self-contained cultural traditions, but rather . . . the recognition of the fact that all culture is an arena of struggle, where self is played off against the purportedly ‘other,’ and

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
Toward a Postcolonial Reading of the Epistle of James offers an interpretation of Jas 2:1-13 putting the text in the midst of the Roman imperial system of rank. This study shows that the conflict of the text has more to do with differences of rank than poverty and wealth. The main problem is that the Christian assemblies are acting according to Roman cultural etiquette instead of their Jewish-Christian heritage when a Roman equestrian and a beggar visit the assembly. The members of the assemblies are accused of having become too Roman. From a postcolonial
perspective, this is a typical case of hybrid identities. Additional key concepts from postcolonialism, such as diaspora, ‘othering’, naming of oppressors, and binarisms such as coloniser/colonised, centre/margin, honour/shame and power/powerless, are highlighted throughout the study.

be too constraining for their now more diverse membership. As I write this paragraph, MECHA leadership has not yet decided on a final name, but for now, they are working under an Espanglish (a hybrid mixture of Spanish and English) acronym: Movimiento Estudiantil Progressive Action ( MEPA ). The

In: Latina/o/x Studies and Biblical Studies

a hybrid of local cultural and Greek elements. This means that, for example, the origin of parables no longer needs to be sought in fables in a mono-causal way; both fables and parables can be seen as mediating a shared cultural background. 12 Through yet another change of context, Sumerian

In: Parables in Changing Contexts
Author: Eric Ottenheijm

sources and the hybridity of ideology and exegesis in rabbinic midrash. Exegetical concerns inform some of the Jesus parables, and non-exegetical parables (rather problematically labelled as “rhetorical”) are known in early rabbinic sources as well. 9 Luke has Jesus tell the parable of the good Samaritan

In: Parables in Changing Contexts
Author: Abraham Smith

. 12 Either term alone may prove limiting unless seen as floating signifiers. As we shall see, an important issue for the project is the avoidance of a hegemonizing nomenclature that does not attend to the vast array of multiple, hybrid identities by which those who designate themselves as African

In: Black/Africana Studies and Black/Africana Biblical Studies

be too constraining for their now more diverse membership. As I write this paragraph, MECHA leadership has not yet decided on a final name, but for now, they are working under an Espanglish (a hybrid mixture of Spanish and English) acronym: Movimiento Estudiantil Progressive Action ( MEPA ). The

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation

:42; Matt 18:6–10; Luke 17:1–4. See Anderson 1976, 237; Hill 1972, 274; Luz 2001, 434. 91 For a more in-depth analysis of the eunuch passage, see Asikainen 2014. 92 Lucian writes that “a eunuch was neither man nor woman (οὔτε ἄνδρα οὔτε γυναῖκα) but something composite, hybrid, and monstrous, alien to human

In: Jesus and Other Men
Author: Abraham Smith

. 12 Either term alone may prove limiting unless seen as floating signifiers. As we shall see, an important issue for the project is the avoidance of a hegemonizing nomenclature that does not attend to the vast array of multiple, hybrid identities by which those who designate themselves as African

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation
Author: Carolyn Sharp

God of most of Hosea and the nurturing deity of Hosea 14. Keefe’s welcome focus on class-based economic motivations for Hosea’s polemics raises a question about the “urban elite male warrior class” that she identifies as responsible for regional economic exploitation; postcolonial notions of hybridity

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology