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A Gospel Critique and Jewish Apology from the Spanish Renaissance
In sixteenth-century Marrakesh, a Flemish merchant converts to Judaism and takes his Catholic brother on a subversive reading of the Gospels and an exploration of the Jewish faith. Their vivid Spanish dialogue, composed by an anonym in 1583, has until now escaped scholarly attention in spite of its success in anti-Christian clandestine literature until the Enlightenment. Based on all nine available manuscripts, this critical edition rediscovers a pioneering work of Jewish self-expression in European languages. The introductory study identifies the author, Estêvão Dias, locates him in insurgent Antwerp at the beginning of the Western Sephardi diaspora, and describes his hybrid culture shaped by the Iberian Renaissance, Portuguese crypto-Judaism, Mediterranean Jewish learning, Protestant theology, and European diplomacy in Africa.

"The Marrakesh Dialogues has been mentioned only rarely in the scholarly literature, and Wilke’s edition and extended discussion constitute the first attempt at editing the text based upon all the textual evidence, placing it into its historical context, identifying the author and the dramatis personae of the text, analysing the treatise’s contents, and presenting it to a wide audience. He is successful because of his broad knowledge of the political and religious trends in early modern Europe, coupled with close familiarity with converso life and literature." - Daniel L. Lasker, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in: Journal of Jewish Studies Vol. LXVII No. 2, pp. 428-35

hybridity (the dissolution of cultural boundaries between groups previously considered as separate; the intermixing of identities) to cast away any notion that medieval Spain was made up of polarized and divisive ethnic communities. Gone is the fixed view of a Reconquista Spain populated by the victors and

In: IMAGES
Author: David Sperber

processes of hybrid- ization and purification (these terms will be explained shortly) as fundamental processes in the construction of mainstream art discourse in Israel. 1 This article is an expanded version of my article (in Hebrew) in Akdamot 24 (2010): 39–55. The principal arguments concern- ing the

In: IMAGES
Author: Steven Fine

explicitly how the Jewish and (mainly) Christian remains reflect a shared though highly complex culture. This approach is consonant with contemporary discussion of Jewish-Christian relations in the Holy Land, and of the interplay between art and its multicultural and sometimes “hybrid” environments

In: IMAGES
Author: Margaret Olin

Without Art: Examining Modern Discourses in Jewish Art (Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 2001), 37–40. to reject the notion of purity altogether, and to embrace the hybridity of a Bezalel. There is usu- ally something unique about an amalgam of di ff erent styles. Indeed, it is hard to forge unique

In: IMAGES

themes. More expressly, while frequently highlighting the photographers’ concern with social justice and content, Morris presents additional components of their oeuvres. Beginning in 1972, Davidson developed a remarkable relationship with Isaac Bashevis Singer, who starred in a hybrid documentary and

In: IMAGES
Author: Sara Lipton

image, from a fifteenth-century Italian Book of Psalms in Hebrew. 1 Epstein and his colleagues convincingly read this cultural boundary blurring—variously called syncretism, acculturation, hybridity, mimicry—as a form of creativity and a sign of confidence, even defiance, rather than ignorance of or

In: IMAGES
Author: David Sperber

Orthodox world. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that the book is missing an important term for a cultural branch of religious Zionism today: Datla”sh (formerly religious). This is the hybrid identity that describes members of religious Zionism who have left the institutional religious world, although

In: IMAGES

: Facing Charlotte Salomon,” or, as explored in Astrid Schmetterling’s “Inscriptions of Di ff erence in Charlotte Salomon’s Work,” the “drama of assimilation” that takes place in the “hybrid space,” Homi Bhabha’s “third space,” “the space between Jewishness and Germanness.” Others look to aspects of

In: IMAGES

to “the Jewish artist” stands as important landmark in the historiography on Jewish identity and visual culture that has devel- oped since then. 70 Larry Silver and other authors in the volume promote what they call “the Jewish history painting.” 71 This so-called hybrid, a genre consisting of

In: IMAGES