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Author: Leora Farber

In this chapter I explore how the ‘immigrant’ experiences of two white female protagonists - the historical figure of Bertha Marks, who immigrated to South Africa from Sheffield in 1886, and myself, as post-colonial persona living in postapartheid South Africa - are performed in the series of photographic work, Ties that Bind Her, exhibited on my art exhibition titled Dis-Location/Re-Location. Themes explored in the work and the chapter include the difficulties inherent in, and processes of, adaptation and transformation, through the psychological discarding and preserving culturally ingrained attitudes, behaviours and values. I touch on Bertha Marks’s attempts to preserve her white, Anglo-Saxon colonial Jewish heritage that is based on the colonial tropes of hierachisation and separateness. I thereafter propose correlations between my ambivalent position as a white, English speaking, second-generation Jewish female living in a postcolonial, post-apartheid South Africa and debates within South African whiteness studies around what Melissa Steyn identifies as a sense of ‘psychological dislocation’ that certain white South Africans are currently experiencing.1 Steyn argues that since South Africa’s first democratic election in 1994, underpinnings of white identity have been challenged through processes of redress; anchors which previously held whiteness secure are shifting or have been removed, resulting in a sense of displacement for those white, English-speaking South Africans who staked much of their identity on their privileged whiteness.2 Bertha Marks’s experiences of dislocation and alienation are considered in parallel with my experiences of displacement from a society caught in the throes of reconstruction and redress. The two personae’s experiences are considered as manifestations of the immigrant’s need to re-locate within ‘her’ new environment, entailing re-evaluations of personal and collective ideologies of gendered whiteness.

In: On Whiteness
Performative Identities and Diasporas
Volume Editors: Alfonso de Toro and Juliane Tauchnitz
This book focuses on one of the main issues of our time in the Humanities and Social Sciences as it analyzes the impact of current global migrations on new forms of living together and the formation of identities and homes. Using a transdisciplinary and transcultural approach the contributions shed fresh light upon key concepts such as ‘ hybrid-performative diaspora’, ‘ transidentities’,‘ hospitality’, ‘ belonging’, ‘ emotion’, ‘ body,’ and ‘ desire’. Those concepts are discussed in the context of Cuban, US-American, Maghrebian, Moroccan, Spanish, Catalan, French, Turkish, Jewish, Argentinian, Indian, and Italian literatures, cultures and religions.
In: A Critical Youth Studies for the 21st Century
Editor-in-Chief: Antonio De Lauri
Individuals are eligible for free access to Public Anthropologist until 31 December 2020, using access token PUAN4U. Click here for more information.

Anthropologists have long engaged communities and topics that are central to contemporary debates. Through ethnographic research, they aim to understand how people’s everyday lives are shaped by and in turn shape larger structural forces. However, although cultural and social anthropology have produced many insights to help us understand the world in which we live, anthropologists have mostly turned their conceptual and therefore ethical gaze inward, with few notable exceptions. Public Anthropologist, an international, peer-reviewed journal, opens the possibility for dialogue and debates that are timely and socially and politically challenging. It creates a hybrid, critical space between the ponderous nature of traditional academic journals and the immediacy of blogs, newspapers, and experts’ accounts. The journal examines the issues of our time in a way that both encourages and scrutinizes a diverse range of shifts outwards from the purely academic realm towards wider publics and counter-publics engaged in cultural and political exchanges and collective collaborations for change. This approach implicitly interrogates the implications and expectations of anthropology’s public presence.

Public Anthropologist boldly and candidly confronts conditions of violence, inequality, and injustice and explores ways in which anthropology might generate public awareness and have an impact on political change. The journal is interested in the space in which newspapers, television, political actors, new media, activists, experts, and academics continually mobilize positions that support or challenge dominant narratives.

The editors believe it is time to definitively push anthropology beyond its association with elitism (and its colonial legacy) and to make it relevant not only for understanding cultural difference, but also for making a difference.

In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles. Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing. Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging.

The editors invite articles and special issues committed to making anthropology speak directly to other scholars and to the wider public on issues related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism. We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. In addition, submissions of interviews or conversations between anthropologists and journalists, activists, political actors, or artists on different topics at the core of the journal’s interests will be considered. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists. Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted.

Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists.

Articles should be between 6000 and 9000 words in length. Reviews should comprise between 1000 and 2000 words. Interviews/conversations should not exceed a maximum of 2500 words.

Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more!

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri.

For review queries, please contact the review editors, John-Andrew McNeish and Andrea Steinke.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Public Anthropologist can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Public Anthropologist Award (PUAN-A)
PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses – in innovative, engaging and compelling ways – key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges. For more information, visit the PUAN-A web page linked above.

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“Sighted” Peer Review
The editors of Public Anthropologist are aware of both the advantages and the limits of blind peer review. In order to promote dynamic exchanges among authors and reviewers, the journal offers “sighted” peer review as an option alongside double-blind peer review. Sighted peer review asks scholars to engage in an open, scientific dialogue. The overall aim is to transform the review process into an open exchange similar to that of a seminar.

The decision to have a submission undergo sighted peer review will be contingent on the explicitly expressed and unqualified willingness of both the author and the reviewers. Absent consent from both sides, double-blind peer review will be the default review model for the journal.

The sighted peer review process works as follows:
Articles will be initially reviewed by members of the editorial team for intrinsic quality, coherence with the aims of the journal, and original contribution to anthropological debates and the advancement of the field. Some submissions will be rejected outright or will be returned with comments and with the recommendation to revise and resubmit. Articles that receive mostly favourable reviews by editorial team members will be reviewed by specialists on the subject. Reviewers will know the names of the authors and will be asked to provide comments and suggestions for minor or more extensive revisions. In turn, authors will know the names of reviewers and will have the opportunity to reply. All exchanges will be monitored and moderated by members of the editorial team. If the editorial team considers comments or responses to be affected by bias or to be expressed in an inappropriate manner, they will request that they be amended or will not forward them. This open review mechanism is based on responsibility, right (to dissent or agree), and awareness.

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Author: Jopi Nyman
Displacement, Memory, and Travel in Contemporary Migrant Writing examines contemporary cultural representations of transforming identities in the era of increasing global mobility. It pays particular attention to the ways in which cultural encounters are experienced affectively and discursively in migrant literature. Divided into three parts that deal with refugee writing and displacement, migration and memory, and new European identities, the volume develops current methodologies and shows how postcolonial studies can be applied to the study of cultural encounters. Writers studied include Simão Kikamba, Ishmael Beah, Madhur Jaffrey, Diana Abu-Jaber, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Caryl Phillips, Jamal Mahjoub, and Monica Ali, and several refugee writers.
Volume Editors: Robin Lefere and Nadia Lie
This book brings together scholars from Europe, Latin America and the United States in a shared effort to assess the critical potential of the transnational paradigm for Spanish and Latin American cinema. After an introductory part, including a state of the art discussion of some 50 publications, the book presents a set of strategically chosen case-studies, grouped into three categories: transnational modes of production, transnational directors, and transnational modes of narration. Written by some of the leading scholars in Hispanic film studies, the book includes contributions on individual directors and producers (e.g. Almodóvar, Buñuel and González Iñárritu), as well as on genres (road movie), interstitial subjectivities (children, queer and diasporic personalities) and festivals (e.g. BAFICI).

Este libro, que es el fruto de la colaboración de académicos de Europa, América Latina y Estados Unidos, debate y detalla la fecundidad crítica del paradigma transnacional en los cines español y latinoamericano. Después de una parte teórica que ofrece un estado de la cuestión basado en más de 50 publicaciones, analiza casos emblemáticos por diversas razones, distribuidos en tres categorías: modos de producción transnacionales, directores transnacionales, narraciones transnacionales. Escritos por destacados especialistas del cine hispánico, los estudios se centran en importantes directores y productores (Almodóvar, Buñuel, González Iñárritu, etc.), en géneros (como la road movie), en subjetividades específicas (niños, personalidades queer o marcadas por el exilio) y en festivales (entre otros, el BAFICI).
Volume Editors: Reindert Dhondt and Dagmar Vandebosch
Transnacionalidad e hibridez en el ensayo hispánico. Un género sin orillas examines how the essay, a privileged genre for the articulation of national identities in Latin America and Spain for decades, is being reconfigured in the present age of globalisation and transnationalisation. The articles included in this volume pay particular attention to the discursive forms and the practices of publishing that question old national categories, without disregarding their relevance.
Starting from some theoretical considerations about the contemporary Latin American essay, the book concentrates especially on three dimensions of transnationalising the essay: the experience of exile, the tensions between the national and the transnational in the redefinition of Hispanic identities, and its relation with the genre’s formal hybridisation, in the work of authors such as Bolaño, Piglia and Vila-Matas.


Transnacionalidad e hibridez en el ensayo hispánico. Un género sin orillas estudia cómo el ensayo, que durante décadas ofreció un foro privilegiado a la articulación de identidades nacionales en Latinoamérica y España, se está reconfigurando en una era de globalización y transnacionalización. Este volumen dedica atención especial a las formas discursivas y los modos de publicación que ponen en entredicho las antiguas categorías nacionales, sin descartar la relevancia de éstas.
Partiendo de unas reflexiones más teóricas sobre el ensayo latinoamericano contemporáneo, el libro se centra en tres dimensiones de transnacionalización, a saber, la experiencia del exilio, las tensiones entre lo nacional y lo transnacional en la redefinición de identidades hispánicas, y la relación con la hibridación formal del género. Se estudian obras de autores como Bolaño, Piglia y Vila-Matas.

(eventually strikingly successful) bid for re-election. However, the neodevelopmentalist policies did not simply displace their neoliberal rivals; they were introduced in parallel with the latter. This uneasy compromise was surprisingly smooth, and this hybrid framework continues to drive the

In: Growth and Change in Neoliberal Capitalism

metaphor ]. Outside Latin America I’m mainly known for the book I co-edited with the Australian sociologist Pam Nilan, Global youth? Hybrid identities and plural worlds (2006), which takes a non-Eurocentric approach to the transnationalization of youth culture. I coedited another volume with Nilan and

In: Youth and Globalization

; Nayak & Kehily, 2013 ) or that between queer and youth ( Driver, 2008 ; Pullen, 2014 ). Youth transnationalism and hybridity have become an almost indispensable facet of discussions ( Kennedy & Roudometof, 2006; Nilan & Feixa, 2006 ). In ‘We Are the Mods’ for example, Feldman (2009) conducted a

In: Youth and Globalization