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Minority Children of Immigrants in Urban Schools
Volume Editors: Rupam Saran and Rosalina Diaz
In an era of ever increasing anti-immigrant sentiment and in the face of the worst economic recession since the great depression, this book presents a timely, compassionate and often moving glimpse into the lives of second generation children of immigrants in urban schools.
The editors and distinguished immigration scholars/ researchers and educators in this book provide compelling research and data that focuses on the effects of ethnic stereotyping on the educational outcomes of youth whose roots span the globe from Puerto Rico to Japan and from Mexico to India, as they struggle to construct identities and make a place for themselves in these United States.
These young people, mostly born in America and attending American schools, must never the less carry the burden of the stereotypes imposed upon their parents and ethnic groups. How they manage to navigate an often biased and unjust system, circumvent roadblocks and recreate themselves as bicultural or hybrid American citizens, makes for a story of courage, resiliency and transformation that restores hope in the fulfillment of the American dream and lends credence to the Emma Lazarus quote inscribed on the “mother of exiles” statue that graces the New York skyline.
“Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, ?
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
Additionally the authors present sane and knowledgeable solutions for supporting the education and emotional/psychological/social growth of these young people in our schools, our classrooms and our lives.
This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!
This series entertains proposals that engage the complex, and dynamic relationship between Education, Culture, and Society in historical, contemporary, and futural contexts. Proposals for manuscripts that address the economic, cultural, and social underpinnings of educational policy and practice in contemporary and historical contexts both locally and globally are welcomed. The range of methodological frameworks for books in this series is broad and includes educational biography, ethnography, auto-ethnography, archival research, oral history, quantitative/qualitative research, as well as speculative philosophical treatises and fiction. The editors will consider manuscripts in the form of research, reflections, philosophic inquiry or fiction that addresses the relationship between education, schooling, culture, and society.

The editorial board seeks manuscripts from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, on all matters related to education, pedagogy, culture, and society. Manuscripts with a focus on education in both formal and informal educational contexts, or education in or out of the School are welcomed. Education in this series is broadly defined to include the transmission of culture inter-generationally. as well as non-traditional educational and cultural forms such as dance, architecture, urban planning, etc.

The series seeks manuscripts that represent creative forms of representation, intent on expanding the conceptual frameworks for understanding the relationships between education, culture, and society.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Acquisitions Editor, Evelien van der Veer.

– positive deviance at the level of communities. The Big Decision for humanity, whether it is made consciously or not, is the choice between transition and Transition. The reality will most likely come out as a hybrid between the two, with some opportunities taken and others lost. The decisive process that

In: Survival How?
In: Educational Technology and Polycontextual Bridging
Coyote Musings on Genízaros, Hybridity, Education, and Slavery
The essays in this volume contain a symphony of carefully orchestrated narratives that engage a wide-ranging assemblage of topics including immigration, indigenous identity, Genízaros, hybridity, education, religious syncretism, and United States and Spanish imperialism. Utilizing excavated memory, archival history, and employing the work of performance and postcolonial theorists, the author examines Native American slavery and captivity in the Spanish Colonial Southwest, with emphasis on Coyotes (indigenous mixed-bloods) of Pueblo/Spanish ancestry as well as descendants of Indigenous servants. The essays engage the cultural politics of education within the context of hybrid religious practices such as pilgrimages to el Cerro de Tepeyac, the site of veneration of the pre-Columbian Goddess Tonanztin and her contemporary, la Señora de Guadalupe; el Santuario de Chimayo, the pre-Hispanic Tewa religious site that continues to serve as the destination for pilgrims, albeit now draped in Catholic ritual; and the Comanche dance ceremony of the Saracino sisters of Atrisco. The essays emerge in part from the author’s childhood in the Barelas and Atrisco neighborhoods of Albuquerque, two of several mixed-blood indigenous communities of New Mexico plagued by a devastating heroin epidemic in the 1950s and 60s.
In: Postcolonial Indigenous Performances
In: Postcolonial Indigenous Performances
Author: Jill Westwood

a frustrating start using the materials and did not know where to begin. The chalks were dusty, dry and dirty. This led me to think about the Australian land of desert and dryness. A tree formed, a kind of hybrid English-Australian tree, a blossoming oak-gum with magenta flowers. Then a desert

In: Art Therapy in Australia