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more justice to the size of most paintings included. Nevertheless, it is a testimony to a critical and logistical effort that sets the ground for further study adressing head-on Foujita’s elaborate brand of hybridity. 1 All quotes from the catalogue are my own translations from the French or Japanese

In: Journal of Japonisme

examines differences in the making and reception of Japanese kimonos, Chinese robes, and hybrid creations, arguing that the “fluidity” (p. 263) that characterizes such multicultural garments is to be acknowledged and shown rather than obviated through essentializing taxonomies. The concluding chapter

In: Journal of Japonisme
Chinese Contemporary Art in the Post-Mao Era
Between State and Market: Chinese Contemporary Art in the Post-Mao Era examines the shift in the system of support for contemporary art in China between 1979 and 1993, from state patronage to the introduction of the market, and the hybrid space that developed in between. Today, soaring prices for contemporary art have triggered a debate about the deleterious effect of the market on art. Yet Jane DeBevoise argues that, in the post-Mao period, the imaginary of the marketplace was liberating, offering artists an alternative framework of legitimacy and support. Based on primary research, DeBevoise explores the entangled role of the state and the market, and how experimental artists and their champions in China negotiated to find a creative space between the two systems to produce and promote their work.
Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema
Over the last two decades, Japanese filmmakers have produced some of the most important and innovative works of cinematic horror. At once visually arresting, philosophically complex, and politically charged, films by directors like Tsukamoto Shinya ( Tetsuo: The Iron Man [1988] and Tetsuo II: Body Hammer [1992]), Sato Hisayasu ( Muscle [1988] and Naked Blood [1995]) Kurosawa Kiyoshi ( Cure [1997], Séance [2000], and Kaïro [2001]), Nakata Hideo ( Ringu [1998], Ringu II [1999], and Dark Water [2002]), and Miike Takashi ( Audition [1999] and Ichi the Killer [2001]) continually revisit and redefine the horror genre in both its Japanese and global contexts. In the process, these and other directors of contemporary Japanese horror film consistently contribute exciting and important new visions, from postmodern reworkings of traditional avenging spirit narratives to groundbreaking works of cinematic terror that position depictions of radical or ‘monstrous’ alterity/hybridity as metaphors for larger socio-political concerns, including shifting gender roles, reconsiderations of the importance of the extended family as a social institution, and reconceptualisations of the very notion of cultural and national boundaries.

by transforming the entire allegory into a piece of traditional Chinese shidiao (時調 popular tune) in twelve stanzas, sung by one of the characters in the novel. By itself, the invocation of shidiao exhibits the hybridity of multiple religious expressions, with the Confucian, Buddhist and Daoist

In: Literary Representations of Christianity in Late Qing and Republican China

the constraints of the Chinese cultural, religious, and political contexts. And it is fair to say that these intriguing and original sources exhibit an extraordinary legacy of the hybridity and heteroglossia of the folkloric traditions in modern China, which in turn reflect direct or subtle Christian

In: Literary Representations of Christianity in Late Qing and Republican China

contextures.” 95 Instead of a wholesale replacement of Buddhism by Christianity, Mission to Heaven has been transformed into a kind of hybrid text: on the one hand having the flavor of Buddhist implications of the original novel, and on the other infiltrating with the Christian references in the target

In: Literary Representations of Christianity in Late Qing and Republican China

men. In so doing, a hybrid text is created in Story of Demon Banishing by the juxtaposition of different biblical passages. Another point of interest is concerned with the temporary release of Satan. According to Revelation 20, Satan will be loosed merely once till the thousand years should be

In: Literary Representations of Christianity in Late Qing and Republican China