Search Results

a frustrating start using the materials and did not know where to begin. The chalks were dusty, dry and dirty. This led me to think about the Australian land of desert and dryness. A tree formed, a kind of hybrid English-Australian tree, a blossoming oak-gum with magenta flowers. Then a desert

In: Art Therapy in Australia

hands walks past on its back legs, creeping ever so quietly down the path. The girl hopes this hybrid creature will stop and try to save this child but the creature is frightened and unsure what to do. Figure 1 Wearing the same dress . Suzanne Perry (2011). Acrylic paint and ink on paper. I stare at a

In: Art Therapy in Australia

practice. You are skilled in “third space thinking” that attends to reciprocity and exchange, of the hybrid and the transcultural. If my generation’s old identity question was “who are we?” I imagine yours will be “how do we all find home in this interconnected world?” Art therapists of the future, more

In: Art Therapy in Australia
Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn
Art Therapy in Australia: Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn explores and enacts established and emergent art therapy histories, narratives and practices in the specific postcolonial context of contemporary Australia. It is the first published book to attempt to map this terrain. In doing so, the book aims to document important aspects of art therapy in Australia, including how Australian approaches both reiterate and challenge the dominant discourse of art therapy. This book is as much a performance as an account of the potential of art therapy to honour alterity, illuminate possibilities and bear witness to the intrapsychic, relational and social realms. The book offers a selective window into the rambling assemblage that is art therapy in the ‘Great Southern Land’.

Contributors are: Jan Allen, Bronwyn Davies, Claire Edwards, Nicolette Eisdell, Patricia Fenner, John Henzell, Pam Johnston, Lynn Kapitan, Carmen Lawson, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna, Michelle Moss, Suzanne Perry, Josephine Pretorius, Jean Rumbold, Victoria Schnaedelbach, Lilian Tan, Jody Thomson, Jill Westwood, Amanda Woodford, and Davina Woods.

. Professional perspectives Art therapy has been described as a “hybrid profession”, derived from art and psychotherapy ( Davis, 2003: 32 ). In Australia, art therapy could arguably be described as the ‘hybrid of a hybrid’, since the majority of art therapists who pioneered art therapy in Australia in the 1980s

In: Art Therapy in Australia

attention to the “contested terrains, global flows, and hybrid identities of a world undeniably marked by histories and legacies of colonization and decolonization” ( Willems-Braun, 1997: 3 ). Clearly I struggle with the term postcolonial, as I wonder when the practices and ideas attributed to the

In: Art Therapy in Australia

. Thomas , Springfield USA . Waller , D. and Sibbett , C . ( 2005 ). (Eds) Art therapy in cancer care . Open University Press , Maidenhead, UK . Westwood , J . ( 2010 ). Hybrid creatures. Mapping the emerging shape of art therapy education in Australia . Unpublished PhD Thesis . University of

In: Art Therapy in Australia

making in Chapter 7, encountering hybrid creatures who witness horror and do impossible things. A fairytale about nameless dread and Abject Art. The dominant discourse of Evidence-Based Practice remains in the contemporary sites of art therapy in Australian cancer care, explored in Chapter 8. Nuanced

In: Art Therapy in Australia

Indigenous/Anglo young people in out-of-home care where negotiating hybridity was an issue. Girls in particular displayed high levels of identity confusion, often resulting in depression. Further research is needed to articulate other models of childhood from an Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and

In: Art Therapy in Australia