Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • All: "hybridity" x
  • Legal History x
  • International Law x
Clear All

in a second state: with a corrected text, but still without the indices. Two surviving copies bear witness to this hybrid state. One is the copy in Salzburg. Here we find that gathering 5F is in its reset condition, with Cap. xxiv moved on to page 781, as explained above, and the corrections made

In: Grotiana

(European, or regional, or local) usages of merchants, 35 moral theological literature should also be taken into account. 36 A recent volume adequately described the early modern situation as one of legal – and by extension ‘normative’ – hybridity. Some normative sources, such as foreign consilia

In: Loans and Credit in Consilia and Decisiones in the Low Countries (c. 1500-1680)

contribution of the peace to modern international law can indeed be reduced to a post factum europeaniza- tion of the German constitutional and religious settlement and thus to the very particular triple or hybrid character of the treaties, or whether, on the contrary, the peace included important new or

In: Grotiana

death of one of the partners, and on the origins of this rule: B. Van Hofstraeten, “Jurisdictional Complexity in Antwerp Company Law (1480–1620)”, in: S.P. Donlan and D. Heirbaut ( eds .), The Laws’ Many Bodies. Studies in Legal Hybridity and Jurisdictional Complexity, c. 1600–1900 [Comparative

In: Loans and Credit in Consilia and Decisiones in the Low Countries (c. 1500-1680)

- oretical, scholarly treatise. The end result is a hybrid construction, which pro- vides a 'still' from the evolutionary process towards a specific treatment of the law of naval warfare and related subjects. With reference to an example of bio- logical evolution, the structure of the Hispallica Advocafio is

In: Grotiana

the 20th century. The cultural and artistic forces of Denis’s own time as well as the subsequent scholarly definition of modernism work against religious art being considered part of the modernist canon. Denis’s uncomfortable hybridity of being religiously devout and a proponent of modern art has

In: Byzantium in Dialogue with the Mediterranean

ignores this question. The reader is thus left to glean insights from Grotius’s scattered comments addressing specific issues. Instead of the hybrid transfer and self-sufficiency theory present in De Indis , Grotius shifts to an account that emphasizes limitations on the subject’s rights in light of

In: Grotiana

origin. Th rough the mediation of the collective will of men, taken as rational crea- tures, derives from the jus naturae the jus naturale secundarium (or jus gentium primarium ), which is hierarchically followed by a category of hybrid norms belonging at the same time to jus civile , jus gentium , jus

In: Grotiana

ignores this question. The reader is thus left to glean insights from Grotius’s scattered comments addressing specific issues. Instead of the hybrid transfer and self-sufficiency theory present in De Indis , Grotius shifts to an account that emphasizes limitations on the subject’s rights in light of

In: Grotiana

the Roman empire, the shore was considered property of the Roman people. Hence, he also concedes that the entire shore could be claimed as the property of the state ( ibid. , p. 31). As Perruso comments, Grotius appar- ently treats the shore as a hybrid between public and common property. Perruso

In: Grotiana