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Educating Media Literacy

The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education

Series:

Allison T. Butler

Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.

Allison Butler PhD

a larger project on the need for critical media education training in teacher preparation and education. For the purposes of this essay, I focus on the current state of media literacy in the United States, including a discussion of critical media literacy and the inclusion of critical media literacy

Peter Westman and Julian McDougall

1 Introduction This research was structured as a multi-sited enquiry, involving working closely on media literacy pedagogy with teachers from different subject areas. A digital ethnographic approach to pedagogy was taken while making use of digital media literacy contexts for creative production

Series:

Allison T. Butler

’ responsibilities to the public, speaks to the 21st century need for critical media literacy. Sixty years after his speech, Murrow’s words are as relevant as ever, and can be extended to our current media technologies. Our media – no longer dominated by TV and radio broadcasting – can teach, they illuminate, and

The series critically investigates and informs the construction of youth identity and identity in general through the study of various forms of contemporary media. It will expand the notions of critical media literacy and its implications for multiple understandings of culture and youth. Since popular culture (including media texts) is one of the primary sites of education for our youth, and all of us, it is crucial for those scholars involved in critical media studies to discuss these issues in book form. The scope of books in this series will include scholarly investigations into the connections among the symbolic order, various forms of cultural artifacts and multiple critical readings of these artifacts within the context of critical/transformational media literacy. How do multiple interpretations of popular culture within conceptualizations of media enhance our understandings of education and how can critical pedagogy, in the Freirian sense, be expanded to develop a student’s critical consciousness of the texts (books, films, games, social media, etc.) that surround them in popular culture.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to Assistant Editor Evelien van der Veer or Series Editor William M. Reynolds.

The Critical Media Literacy Guide

Engaging Media and Transforming Education

Series:

Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share

Over half the world’s population is now online, interconnected through a globally-networked media and consumer society. The convergence of information, media, and technology has created the predominant ecosystem of our time. Yet, most educational institutions are still teaching what and how they have for centuries, and are thus increasingly out-of-date and out-of-touch with our current needs. The Critical Media Literacy Guide: Engaging Media and Transforming Education provides a theoretical framework and practical applications for educators and teacher education programs to transform education by putting critical media literacy into action in classrooms with students from kindergarten to university. Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share lay out the evolution of thinking and development of media and cultural studies, from the Frankfurt School to current intersectional theories about information and power that highlight the importance of race, gender, class, and sexuality. They provide insightful and accessible entry into theorizing education and information communication technologies through linking the politics of representation with critical pedagogy.

The increase in fake news, alternative facts, bots, and trolls, challenge our abilities to judge credibility and recognize bias. Kellner and Share present a critical lens and strategies to contextualize and analyze the dominant ideologies going viral across social media platforms and disseminated globally from enormous transnational corporations. The Critical Media Literacy Guide is a powerful resource to analyze and challenge representations and narratives of multiple forms of identity, privilege, and oppression. Since the struggle for social justice and democracy require new theories and pedagogies to maneuverer the constantly changing terrain, this book is essential for all educators.

Series:

Allison T. Butler

inclusive, student-friendly method – without appearing overly casual or uninformed. This chapter argues that the inclusion of critical media literacy into teacher education can both bridge that divide and make classrooms and curricula more relevant. With its emphasis on critical analysis and creative

This is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to conceptualizations of criticality in media literacy. The focus is on articles that engage with media in ways that disrupt the normative discourses perpetuated through market logics and dominate institutions, promote ways of thinking critically about and with digital media culture, and present opportunities for analyzing and interpreting the codes, conventions, and ideologies implicit in our media saturated lives. It also centers on the ways in which critical media literacy is absent in today’s standardized educational curriculum. JCML has two issues per volume. It is a peer refereed journal and is available as hard copy and online. The hard copy issues can include artwork, and photographs. The on-line version can include artwork, photographs, audio and videos. Manuscripts can cover but are not limited to such topics as: the history of the field of critical media literacy, the state of critical media literacy studies and the urgency of critical media literacy knowledge at the present historical moment, critical media literacy in classrooms, etc.

For questions and/or submissions please contact the Editors, Bill Reynolds and/or Brad Porfilio.

Ana Cruz and Joachim Dorsch

caused by disinformation maliciously spread through cyberspace. This creates crises all over the world and is an issue that calls for a critical media literacy if we aim for more (social) justice, equity, and freedom from violence. Understanding that “media study is interdisciplinary study” ( McLuhan

Petar Jandrić

, everyone watches the same advertisements. Streaming services such as YouTube use recommendation systems to direct us towards watching certain content and offer personalized advertisements, yet we can always choose to watch something else. Critical media literacy is important, because it helps us navigate