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Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period

Narrations, Practices, and Images

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Edited by Eftychia Stavrianopoulou

There is a long tradition in classical scholarship of reducing the Hellenistic period to the spreading of Greek language and culture far beyond the borders of the Mediterranean. More than anything else this perception has hindered an appreciation of the manifold consequences triggered by the creation of new spaces of connectivity linking different cultures and societies in parts of Europe, Asia and Africa. In adopting a new approach this volume explores the effects of the continuous adaptations of ideas and practices to new contexts of meaning on the social imaginaries of the parties participating in these intercultural encounters. The essays show that the seemingly static end-products of the interaction between Greek and non-Greek groups, such as texts, images, and objects, were embedded in long-term discourses, and thus subject to continuously shifting processes.

Exploring the Scripturesque

Jewish Texts and their Christian Contexts

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Robert Alan Kraft

These essays span about a third of a century and include both previously published and some unpublished studies by Robert A. Kraft which focus on interfaces between Jewish materials and the worlds in which they were transmitted and/or perceived, especially Christian contexts. The initial section on general context and methodology is followed by several detailed studies by way of example. The final section touches on some related issues involving Philonic and other texts. The primary concern is with "scripturesque" materials and traditions, whether they later became canonical or not, that seem to have been respected as “scriptural” by some individuals or communities in the period prior to (or apart from) the development of an exclusivistic canonical consciousness in some Jewish and Christian circles.

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Samuel Hildebrandt

In Interpreting Quoted Speech, Samuel Hildebrandt analyzes the literary phenomenon of one speaker quoting the words of another speaker within prophetic discourse. Challenging approaches that categorize these speech quotations and use them as direct windows into Israel’s past, Hildebrandt makes a compelling case for reading quoted speech in its literary context. He presents a substantial method for such an interpretive approach, demonstrates its value in a detailed analysis of Jeremiah 2.1-3.5, and highlights the significance of quoted phrases in Jeremiah and other prophetic texts. Interpreting Quoted Speech marks an important contribution to the exploration of Jeremiah’s discourse and polyphony and, due to its accessible methodology and exegesis, offers a model for further research in prophetic literature.

The Materiality of Texts from Ancient Egypt

New Approaches to the Study of Textual Material from the Early Pharaonic to the Late Antique Period

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Edited by F.A.J. Hoogendijk and Steffie van Gompel

The volume The Materiality of Texts from Ancient Egypt contains nine contributions from well-known papyrologists, Egyptologists, archaeologists and technical specialists. They discuss the materiality of ancient writing and writing supports in various ways through methodological considerations and through practical case studies from the early Pharaonic to the Late Antique periods in Egypt, including Greek and Egyptian papyri and ostraca, inscriptions and graffiti.
The articles in this volume present new approaches to the study of textual material and scribal practice, especially in the light of the ongoing development of digital techniques that uncover new information from ancient writing materials. The aim of the book is to encourage researchers of ancient texts to consider the benefits of using these new methods and technological resources.

CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions

Case Studies on Archaeological Data, Objects, Texts, and Digital Archiving

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Edited by Vanessa Bigot Juloux, Amy Rebecca Gansell and Alessandro Di Ludovico

CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions is now available on PaperHive! PaperHive is a new free web service that offers a platform to authors and readers to collaborate and discuss, using already published research. Please visit the platform to join the conversation. CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions provides case studies on archaeology, objects, cuneiform texts, and online publishing, digital archiving, and preservation.
Eleven chapters present a rich array of material, spanning the fifth through the first millennium BCE, from Anatolia, the Levant, Mesopotamia, and Iran. Customized cyber- and general glossaries support readers who lack either a technical background or familiarity with the ancient cultures. Edited by Vanessa Bigot Juloux, Amy Rebecca Gansell, and Alessandro Di Ludovico, this volume is dedicated to broadening the understanding and accessibility of digital humanities tools, methodologies, and results to Ancient Near Eastern Studies. Ultimately, this book provides a model for introducing cyber-studies to the mainstream of humanities research

A Gospel Synopsis of the Greek Text of Matthew, Mark and Luke

A Comparison of Codex Bezae and Codex Vaticanus

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Edited by Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps

The aim of this new Gospel Synopsis is to enhance the study of the Synoptic Gospels and provide insights into the synoptic problem through a clear presentation of the Greek text. Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps set out the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in turn, comparing each line by line with the other two.
A further innovative feature is that the text is presented according to two important Gospel manuscripts, Codex Bezae and Codex Vaticanus, rather than the usual eclectic edition of the Greek New Testament. Thus, not only are the differences between the Gospels clearly visible but also, the complexity of their relationship is more easily identified through the comparison of two divergent manuscripts representative of distinct traditions.

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Elizabeth Agaiby

completeness, I have provided in Chapter six a thorough codicological study of MS St Paul ( History ) 53. The methodology is based on the framework specified by Bentley Layton 16 but has been adapted to reflect the various aspects of Arabic manuscript studies discussed by Adam Gacek. 17 The structure and

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Rodney Ast

particular times. As a methodological approach, the study of hands in papyrological texts is not entirely new. It has been used to elucidate aspects of archival material, for example. 4 Yet, it has not been employed as extensively as one might expect, perhaps because of the tedious and subjective nature of

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Massimiliano S. Pinarello

platypus suggested it should have been placed among birds, while some other elements indicated it might have been a reptile. What does this have to do with ancient Egypt and writing? Everything, I might say. Everything in the methodological sense of fitting something unknown into an existing system of