Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • All: "methodology" x
  • Literature & Linguistics x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by Klaas Smelik and Karolien Vermeulen

In this volume twelve contributions discuss the relevance, accuracy, potential, and possible alternatives to a literary reading of ancient Jewish writings, especially the Hebrew Bible. Drawing on different academic fields (biblical studies, rabbinic studies, and literary studies) and on various methodologies (literary criticism, rhetorical criticism, cognitive linguistics, historical criticism, and reception history), the essays form a state-of-the-art overview of the current use of the literary approach toward ancient Jewish texts. The volume convincingly shows that the latest approaches to a literary reading can still enhance our understanding of these texts.

The Semantics of Glory

A Cognitive, Corpus-Based Approach to Hebrew Word Meaning

Series:

Marilyn Burton

Despite its centrality in mainstream linguistics, cognitive semantics has only recently begun to establish a foothold in biblical studies, largely due to the challenges inherent in applying such a methodology to ancient languages. The Semantics of Glory addresses these challenges by offering a new, practical model for a cognitive semantic approach to Classical Hebrew, demonstrated through an exploration of the Hebrew semantic domain of glory. The concept of ‘glory’ is one of the most significant themes in the Hebrew Bible, lying at the heart of God’s self-disclosure in biblical revelation. This study provides the most comprehensive examination of the domain to date, mapping out its intricacies and providing a framework for its exegesis.

Series:

Marieke Dhont

pay more attention to the methodology involved in the study of rhetorical features in lxx translations in the next chapter. The present section serves to introduce the reader to the use of rhetorical features in og Job and move the argumentation of this book from discussing elements pertaining to

Series:

Marieke Dhont

Brekelmans; betl 33; Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1974), 39–61. The latter can also be considered a rhetorical feature, but this lies outside of the scope of this research. It could be a point of departure for further research, if the necessary methodological precautions are taken, see Kabergs

Series:

Marieke Dhont

the underlying methodological hazards of the percentage offered by Galen Marquis, “Word Order as a Criterion for the Evaluation of Translation Technique in the lxx and the Evaluation of Word Order Variants as Exemplified in lxx -Ezekiel,” Textus 13 (1986): 5984, 6466. The latter calculated that

Ancient Hebrew Periodization and the Language of the Book of Jeremiah

The Case for a Sixth-Century Date of Composition

Series:

Aaron Hornkohl

In Ancient Hebrew Periodization and the Language of the Book of Jeremiah, Aaron Hornkohl defends the diachronic approach to Biblical Hebrew and the linguistic dating of biblical texts. Applying the standard methodologies to the Masoretic version of the biblical book of Jeremiah, he seeks to date the work on the basis of its linguistic profile, determining that, though composite, Jeremiah is likely a product of the transitional time between the First and Second Temple Periods.

Hornkohl also contributes to unraveling Jeremiah’s complicated literary development, arguing on the basis of language that its 'short edition', as reflected in the book’s Old Greek translation, predates that 'supplementary material' preserved in the Masoretic edition but unparalleled in the Greek. Nevertheless, he concludes that neither is written in Late Biblical Hebrew proper.