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Edited by Klaas Smelik and Karolien Vermeulen

In this volume twelve contributions discuss the relevance, accuracy, potential, and possible alternatives to a literary reading of ancient Jewish writings, especially the Hebrew Bible. Drawing on different academic fields (biblical studies, rabbinic studies, and literary studies) and on various methodologies (literary criticism, rhetorical criticism, cognitive linguistics, historical criticism, and reception history), the essays form a state-of-the-art overview of the current use of the literary approach toward ancient Jewish texts. The volume convincingly shows that the latest approaches to a literary reading can still enhance our understanding of these texts.

The Semantics of Glory

A Cognitive, Corpus-Based Approach to Hebrew Word Meaning

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Marilyn Burton

Despite its centrality in mainstream linguistics, cognitive semantics has only recently begun to establish a foothold in biblical studies, largely due to the challenges inherent in applying such a methodology to ancient languages. The Semantics of Glory addresses these challenges by offering a new, practical model for a cognitive semantic approach to Classical Hebrew, demonstrated through an exploration of the Hebrew semantic domain of glory. The concept of ‘glory’ is one of the most significant themes in the Hebrew Bible, lying at the heart of God’s self-disclosure in biblical revelation. This study provides the most comprehensive examination of the domain to date, mapping out its intricacies and providing a framework for its exegesis.

Ancient Hebrew Periodization and the Language of the Book of Jeremiah

The Case for a Sixth-Century Date of Composition

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Aaron Hornkohl

In Ancient Hebrew Periodization and the Language of the Book of Jeremiah, Aaron Hornkohl defends the diachronic approach to Biblical Hebrew and the linguistic dating of biblical texts. Applying the standard methodologies to the Masoretic version of the biblical book of Jeremiah, he seeks to date the work on the basis of its linguistic profile, determining that, though composite, Jeremiah is likely a product of the transitional time between the First and Second Temple Periods.

Hornkohl also contributes to unraveling Jeremiah’s complicated literary development, arguing on the basis of language that its 'short edition', as reflected in the book’s Old Greek translation, predates that 'supplementary material' preserved in the Masoretic edition but unparalleled in the Greek. Nevertheless, he concludes that neither is written in Late Biblical Hebrew proper.

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Moshe Lavee

later governing voice of the Talmud. Such use of two apparently contradictory methods might give pause for thought. The nature of the Bavli itself, however, clarifies this methodological move. As a text, the Bavli took on a canonical status without being subjected to formal canonization and redaction

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Moshe Lavee

’s methodological list in “A Critical Study”, 301–307. Further, the meimra is also cited in the discussion of the fifth baraita , where it appears without the prooftext, suggesting that the Hebrew meimra concerning the need for three originally circulated without the prooftext implying the existence of the

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Johan de Joode

select these elements of the theory and methodology that are fit for use within literary analysis. When referring to SPACE as a source domain, I use small capitals, elsewhere I take the liberty of not using special formatting for the word space, even if it can refer to the concept of SPACE . 4 This

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Moshe Lavee

methodology applied in this book. A naive reading would consider that stricter views are attributed both to the majority of the tannaim and to Rabbi Yohnan simply because this is how it was. Both attributions are authentic; Rabbi Yohanan reinforced in the third century the views that were already held by the