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Series:

Emiel L. Eijdenberg

research and theory that form part of a larger whole” ( Rousseau and Fried 2001 : 1). In doing so, we could more adequately tackle important challenges, as discussed by Welter (2011) in terms of developing research designs. In this regard, this chapter 1 discusses a number of methodological challenges

Series:

Barry O’Halloran

inventor of history writing had transformed ‘legend-writing into the science of history.’ 10 He laid the foundations upon which Thucydides later integrated important methodological precepts by insisting that ‘historical inquiry rests on evidence’. 11 On the debit side, one of Herodotus’ most

Series:

József Laszlovszky, Balázs Nagy, Péter Szabó and András Vadas

This book attempts to survey the economic history and production of medieval Hungary using an up-to-date approach, and draws on a wide range of sources. Correspondingly, the characteristics of the sources that are available, problems with methodology, and historiographical legacy are considered in

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Cameron Sutt

In Slavery in Árpád-era Hungary in a Comparative Context, Cameron Sutt examines servile labour in the first three centuries of the Hungarian kingdom and compares it with dependent labour in Carolingian Europe. Such comparative methodology provides a particularly clear view of the nature of dependent labour in both regions.
Using legislation as well as charter evidence, Sutt establishes that lay landlords of Árpádian Hungary frequently relied upon slaves to work their land, but the situation in Carolingian areas was much more complex. The use of slave labour in Hungary continued until the end of the thirteenth century when a combination of economic and political factors brought it to an end.

Series:

Nils Hybel

In The Nature of Kingship c. 800-1300. The Danish Incident Nils Hybel presents the first comprehensive history of the changeable nature of monarchial power in Danish territories from the Viking Age to the Central Middle Ages. The work offers a pioneering methodological approach entirely based on medieval conceptions on sovereign power. This innovative approach involves contemporary ideas, not modern notions of power and kingship, being used to undertake the analysis. The Danish “Incident” is therefore integrated within the European context.
Kingship experienced a profound transformation during the half millennium investigated. A royal genealogy and strong bonds with Christian institutions were established in the late eleventh century. In the middle of the twelfth century the Danish realm was united, followed by the final liberation from German hegemony and the expansion of the realm with German and Slavic fiefs in the late twelfth century. At the same time, with the first signs of taxation, legislation, law enforcement and the notion of a national, military force, kings began the transition from warlords to medieval kingship. With stirrings of constitutionalism from 1241 onwards, this development of a national, medieval, kingdom intensified, though by c. 1300 the kingdom had not yet reached the point of total sovereign power.

Series:

Barry O’Halloran

Greek and Roman economic history.’ 10 When he died in 1986, his model of the ancient economy had become ‘the new orthodoxy’. 11 The critique that follows is highly critical of both his methodology and many of his conclusions, but from the outset it is important to acknowledge his enormous achievements

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Loïc Charles and Guillaume Daudin

Methodology STRO and FBT are sources of a very different nature, which makes a direct match impossible. On the one hand, STRO includes information that concerns ships and cargoes rather than flows. Moreover, the Danish authorities were registering the volume of the cargo rather than its value. On the

Series:

Jan Willem Veluwenkamp and Werner Scheltjens

Dutch Baltic trade. 2 Combining STR ’s different dimensions – place, time, cargoes, and individuals – was extremely time-consuming and therefore hardly feasible. 3 Now STRO has become available and several methodological tools and instruments for making use of the data are in place. There is just

Series:

Barry O’Halloran

historical evidence, the application of the methodology cannot perforce be as comprehensive as in the case of modern economic history. It is also worth reminding ourselves that, as indicated from the outset, path dependence is part of an emerging trend in the application of institutional economics to extend