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Edited by Massimo Pendenza

Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism defends classical sociology from the accusation of ‘methodological nationalism’. To reject such accusation, the volume presents three arguments. The first contends that classical sociology has not failed to deal with the global world (Part I). The second, that classical sociology has more frequently dealt with the transnational category of the ‘social’, rather than with the ‘national’ (Part II). The third, that where classical sociology has analysed national society, the latter has never been envisaged as a rigidly confined entity within its political boundaries (Part III). The outcome is a re-evaluation of classical sociological thought as a more functional tool for analysing the political forms of modernity in the era of globalisation.

Contributors include: Vittorio Cotesta, David Inglis, Austin Harrington, Massimo Pendenza, Michael Schillmeier, Emanuela Susca, Dario Verderame, and Federico Trocini.

The Methodology of Maurice Hauriou

Legal, Sociological, Philosophical

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Christopher Berry Gray

This book shows that Hauriou’s positivist and pragmatic jurisprudence and social theory, as well as their application to the study of institutions, is satisfactorily supported by his idealistic philosophy. The nine chapters first locate Hauriou’s influences, then situate his disciplinary methodologies within methodology in general. The central chapters concern each of the three methodologies in turn.

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Jan Franciszek Jacko

thesis of the study is that respect for some moral (autotelic) values is a condition for methodologically rational decisions, namely, the decisions which do not satisfy the condition are either not methodologically

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Jan Franciszek Jacko

methodologically rational decisions, namely, the decisions which do not satisfy the condition are either not methodologically rational at all or not fully rational. It is a moral condition for methodologically rational decision making. The paper shows arguments supporting the thesis in theories by Aristotle

Erin Sullivan

and the arts, as well as a handful of major studies by historians that have embraced artistic sources. 6 That said, extended engagement with aesthetic works at the methodological and historiographical heart of our field – primarily shaped, I would suggest, by historians – remains somewhat atypical

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Belinda Crawford Camiciottoli

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Benjamin Rampp

The aim of the following exposition is to critically analyse the concept of human security in security studies and suggest some methodological refinements. First, I will comment on the gradual expansion of the classic concept of security. This expansion comprises two dimensions—deepening and broadening. I will then illustrate how the expansion of security in general is reproduced in the concept of human security and why this presents a problem. To this end, I will first introduce the human security approach and then elaborate on the advantages and disadvantages of the expansion in this context. In particular, I will show how the broadening of human security and its resultant conceptual ambiguity prove to be a fundamental problem. I will establish that the conceptual impreciseness has negative and—regarding human security’s original intention—counterproductive impacts on the concept’s political effect. Here the securitization of originally non-security issues will be central to my argument. This problem with human security is not purely of academic interest, but has impacts on practice, as is illustrated and discussed at the end of this chapter in relation to humanitarian intervention. As a preliminary solution I suggest (from a methodological point of view) the use of a ‘core concept’ of human security which concentrates on the physical inviolability of the individual. Finally, I will elucidate this narrow conception as a first step towards a broader desecuritization process aimed at preserving the adequateness of security ascriptions.