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Stephen G. Parker, Jenny Berglund, David Lewin and Deirdre Raftery

international perspectives. In this vein, we welcome proposals for future issues from scholars from all parts of the world on topics of relevance to the journal’s broad remit, and from differing methodological standpoints. The long-form format of this journal makes the publication of in-depth studies uniquely

Nader Al-Refai and Christopher Bagley

Diasporic Ruptures

Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity; Volume I

Series:

Edited by Alireza Asgharzadeh, Erica Lawson, Keyleen U. Oka and Amar Wahab

Diasporic Ruptures: Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity lies at the intersections of various processes emerging from globalization: border-crossings, transnationalism, identity formations. Carefully selected and placed in two volumes, the essays here represent works of both well-seasoned scholars as well as emerging writers, academics and intellectuals. The volumes critically examine various manifestations of the trend now commonly known as globalization—manifestations that many diasporic communities, immigrants, and people from all walks of life experience. They also illuminate recent political, social, economic and technological developments that are taking place in a rapidly changing world.
Volume One offers sophisticated insights into the nature of contemporary formations of diasporic life, internationalism, and hybrid identities. The volume asks bold questions around what it means to live in constantly shifting boundaries of nationality, identity, and citizenship. The type of methodological, discursive and experiential awareness promoted by this work helps us understand how millions of people face the challenge of living in a globalizing world; it also fosters a consciousness of how globalization itself functions differently in different environments.
Volume Two (see Volume 7 in Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education) addresses additional and more nuanced questions around culture, race, sexuality, migration, displacement and resistance. It also explores certain epistemological and methodological fallacies regarding conventional articulations of nation-state, nationalism, and the local/global nexus. The volume seeks to answer questions such as: What are the meanings and connotations of ‘displacement’ in a rapidly globalizing world? What are some dilemmas and challenges around notions of cultural hybridity, linguistic diversity, and a sense of belonging? What is the meaning of home in diaspora and the meaning of diaspora at home?
Together, the volumes raise many topics that will be of immense interest to scholars across disciplines and general readers. While celebrating the increasing acknowledgment of difference and diversity in recent times, this work reminds us of the ongoing ramifications of dominant structures of inequality, relations of power, and issues of inclusion and exclusion. This work offers different ways of thinking, writing and talking about globalization and the processes that emerge from it.

Diasporic Ruptures

Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity; Volume II

Series:

Edited by Alireza Asgharzadeh, Erica Lawson, Keyleen U. Oka and Amar Wahab

Diasporic Ruptures: Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity lies at the intersections of various processes emerging from globalization: border-crossings, transnationalism, identity formations. Carefully selected and placed in two volumes, the essays here represent works of both well-seasoned scholars as well as emerging writers, academics and intellectuals. The volumes critically examine various manifestations of the trend now commonly known as globalization—manifestations that many diasporic communities, immigrants, and people from all walks of life experience. They also illuminate recent political, social, economic and technological developments that are taking place in a rapidly changing world.
Volume One (see Volume 6 in Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education)offers sophisticated insights into the nature of contemporary formations of diasporic life, internationalism, and hybrid identities. The volume asks bold questions around what it means to live in constantly shifting boundaries of nationality, identity, and citizenship. The type of methodological, discursive and experiential awareness promoted by this work helps us understand how millions of people face the challenge of living in a globalizing world; it also fosters a consciousness of how globalization itself functions differently in different environments.
Volume Two addresses additional and more nuanced questions around culture, race, sexuality, migration, displacement and resistance. It also explores certain epistemological and methodological fallacies regarding conventional articulations of nation-state, nationalism, and the local/global nexus. The volume seeks to answer questions such as: What are the meanings and connotations of ‘displacement’ in a rapidly globalizing world? What are some dilemmas and challenges around notions of cultural hybridity, linguistic diversity, and a sense of belonging? What is the meaning of home in diaspora and the meaning of diaspora at home?
Together, the volumes raise many topics that will be of immense interest to scholars across disciplines and general readers. While celebrating the increasing acknowledgment of difference and diversity in recent times, this work reminds us of the ongoing ramifications of dominant structures of inequality, relations of power, and issues of inclusion and exclusion. This work offers different ways of thinking, writing and talking about globalization and the processes that emerge from it.

Transformative Teacher Research

Theory and Practice for the C21st

Series:

Edited by Pamela Burnard, Britt-Marie Apelgren and Nese Cabaroglu

The aim of this book is to bring teacher research to the centre of attention in educational research. Knowledge generated by researching teachers and teacher researchers—often in collaboration with university researchers—identifying new and innovative research methodologies and theories, feeds directly back into theorising practice and the practice of theory that is necessary to improve student learning. This edited volume is unique in that it details diverse teacher research practices and partnerships across a diversity of cultural settings (from Sweden, Turkey, South Africa, Cyprus, Singapore, Hong Kong/China, Australia and the UK). In this volume, 19 internationally acknowledged researchers from nine different countries draw on and develop a new wave of theory and practice for transformative teaching and learning. Themes explored include: contributions of the latest emerging theories and research approaches, types/models of university-school partnerships and teacher research communities which build, change and sustain educational reform, empirical findings and evidence-based benefits from teacher research and professional learning, critical policy research in teacher research, innovative approaches to course designs with an aim to transform understanding of teaching and teacher research.

William F. Massy

Education for innovation is shown to be synergistic with education quality defined broadly. Such education includes both general and specific approaches. The general approach draws on Derek Bok’s core purposes of an undergraduate education: learning to communicate, learning to think, building character, preparation for citizenship, living with diversity, preparing for a global society, acquiring broader interests, and preparing for a career. The specific approach, education about innovation and entrepreneurship, describes the process of innovation and presents role models to motivate students and help immunize them from the fear of failure. Topics include creative destruction, entrepreneurs, the adoption process for innovations, effects on productivity, and change agency. They are relevant to the education of informed citizens as well as training for would-be entrepreneurs

The idea of change agency extends to the challenge of furthering education for innovation in universities. The topics here represent “academic quality work” and “academic audit.” Academic quality work refers to efforts by departments and individual faculty members to set educational goals, map the goals into curricular design, design appropriate teaching and learning methods (including active learning), assess student and teacher performance, and assure quality. Academic audit refers to a methodology for ascertaining the maturity of a department’s academic quality work and encouraging improvement. Examples of how academic quality work and academic audit can be adapted to include factors important in education for innovation are provided. Explicit answers to the five guiding questions that motivate this volume are given in the last section of the chapter.

Bülent Avcı

precisely frames the main question that the book offers an answer to: Given the restrictions imposed by standardized education, how much space can be cleared to practice CME ? Research Methodology For classroom-based research in education, it is crucial that the methodology fits the dynamics of daily

What is the Story?

Reading the Web as Narrative

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Sharon A. Murchie and Janet A. Neyer

confirmation bias. What Is The Story? Analyzing The Narrative Classroom English language arts teachers have always taught students to analyze the narrative, to find the essence of the story, regardless of what teaching methodology has been in vogue. Whether the strategies have focused on reader response or on

An Educator’s Primer

Fake News, Post-Truth, and a Critical Free Press

Series:

P. L. Thomas

conflicts of interest (Teach For America and KIPP leaders sit on the Advisory Board), for a flawed study design, and for shoddy methodology. So how are credible academic critiques of NCTQ characterized in the journalism that claims not to take evaluative positions?: When NCTQ released a version of this