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Edited by Anita Fetzer and Kerstin Fischer

The multifaceted and heterogeneous category of common ground is central to theories of pragmatics, sociolinguistics, discourse and context. This book addresses current approaches to common ground from the novel perspective of lexical markers. The edited volume falls in two parts. The first part addresses the relationship between mechanisms of grounding and reference to common ground. The second part examines different types of common ground. It is shown that the investigation of lexical markers provides a novel perspective for investigating the relationship between grounding, common ground and common grounds. Contributions are by Sherri L. Condon and Claude G. Cech, Anita Fetzer, Kerstin Fischer, Francois Nemo, Thanh Nyan, Moeko Okada, Carlos Rodriguez Penagos, Karin Pittner and Thora Tenbrink. It reviews current approaches to common ground from the perspective of lexical markers. It is organized into two parts that discuss the relationship between mechanisms of grounding. It is a reference to common ground and the different types of common ground. It reflects current trends in the field that cross methodological boundaries and integrate cognition, context, genre, negotiation of meaning, and dialogue.

Numerous Meanings

The Meaning of English Cardinals and the Legacy of Paul Grice

Series:

Bert Bultinck

Outlandish as it may seem to the uninitiated, the meaning of English cardinal numbers has been the object of many heated and fascinating debates. Notwithstanding the numerous important objections that have been formulated in the last three decades, the (neo-)Gricean, scalar account is still the standard semantic description of numerals.
In this book, Bultinck writes the history of this implicature-driven approach and demonstrates that it suffers from methodological insecurity and postulates highly non-conventional meanings of numerals as their "literal meaning", while it confuses the level of lexical semantics with that of utterances and cannot deal with a large number of counter-examples. Relying on the results of an extensive corpus-based analysis, an alternative account of the meaning of English cardinals and the ways in which their interpretation is influenced by other linguistic elements is presented. As such, this analysis constitutes a prism that offers todays linguist an iridescent history of one of the most fascinating, if often misconstrued, topics in contemporary meaning research: the conversational implicatures.

Series:

Edited by Daniel Gutzmann and Hans-Martin Gärtner

Beyond Expressives: Explorations in Use-Conditional Meaning offers empirical and theoretical studies of expressions whose meaning falls outside the standard realm of truth-conditional semantics. Aspects of meaning that are better captured by their use-conditions instead came into the spotlight of formal semantics recently, mainly due to the raised interest in expressions like interjections or swear words. Going beyond such expressives, the contributions provide detailed semantic analyses of a broad range of use-conditional items, including particles, non-inflectional constructions, personal datives and interpretational effects of focus. This volume thereby proves that the empirical domain of use-conditional meaning is as diverse as the truth-conditional one, equally amenable to systematic semantic treatments.

This book is an exciting, eye-opening collection of novel and challenging data from English, German and Japanese. For anyone who needs persuading that there is more to language expressivity than informational content, this book is a must. For those who need no persuading, this book will be no less a treat. It offers to all not merely sets of entrancing new observations, but also analyses which feed one’s imagination as to how best to extend current methodologies to make these data tractable for formal modelling. Ruth Kempson, King’s College

Series:

Edited by Kerstin Fischer

Approaches to Discourse Particles serves as a unique reference by presenting the spectrum of approaches to discourse particles/markers in their richness and variability, whilst ensuring that the differences and similarities between the approaches are clear and comparable. With the hundreds of studies now published on discourse particles/markers, it is becoming increasingly difficult to make such comparisons. Fischer addresses this problem by asking renowned researchers from different linguistic backgrounds to describe their particular ways of accounting for some of the most important problem areas by addressing issues such as: definition; the functional spectrum of the items considered; the model of polyfunctionality proposed; and the broader framework of the model.Discourse particles fulfil many different functions; they contribute to text structuring, dialogue management, turn-taking, politeness, and more. Their investigation is, thus, relevant from many different perspectives within pragmatics and linguistics as a whole. Approaches to Discourse Particles constitutes an important orientation for newcomers to the field, as well as providing the necessary guidance and reference for the many scholars now working in the growing research community.

"Wide-ranging and useful... Places the assumptions underlying divergent approaches in sharp relief." – Lawrence Schourup, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan

Tradition of the Lvov-Warsaw School

Ideas and Continuations

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Edited by Anna Brożek, Alicja Chybińska, Jacek Jadacki and Jan Woleński

The volume aims to show the variety of research currents of the Lvov-Warsaw School and the ways in which these currents are developed today. The content of the book is divided into three parts. The first part provides an overview of the logico-semiotical achievements of the Lvov-Warsaw School. It also includes analyses of specific problems: categorial grammar, theory of truth, theory of reasoning and semiotic defects. The second part presents some metaphysical and ontological views of Twardowski, Kotarbiński, Ajdukiewicz, Bocheński and Lejewski. In the third part, specific features of psychological and sociological branches of the Lvov-Warsaw School are discussed.

Contributors include: Anna Brożek, Wojciech Buszkowski, Alicja Chybińska, Mariusz Grygianiec, Aleksandra Horecka, Stepan Ivanyk, Jacek Jadacki, Ryszard Kleszcz, Natalia Miklaszewska, Wioletta Miśkiewicz, Teresa Rzepa, Piotr Surma, Jan Woleński, and Marta Zaręba.

Series:

Edited by Anna Brożek and Jacek Jadacki

Izydora Dąmbska (1904-1982) was a Polish philosopher; a student of Kazimierz Twardowski, and his last assistant. Her output consists of almost 300 publications. The main domains of her research were semiotics, epistemology and broadly understood methodology as well as axiology and history of philosophy. Dąmbska’s approach to philosophical problems reflected tendencies that were characteristic of the Lvov-Warsaw School. She applied high methodological standards but has never limited the domain of analyzed problems in advance.
The present volume includes twenty-eight translations of her representative papers. As one of her pupils rightly wrote: “Dąmbska’s works may help everyone [...] to think clearly. Her attitude of an unshaken philosopher may help anyone to hold oneself straight, and, if necessary, to get up after a fall”.

Understanding Participant-Reference Shifts in the Book of Jeremiah

A Study of Exegetical Method and its Consequences for the Interpretation of Referential Incoherence

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Oliver Glanz

In prophetic and poetic literature of the Old Testament references to textual participants are inconsistent with regard to their gender, number and person characteristics. Oliver Glanz for the first time provides a systematic study of the phenomenon of participant-reference shifts. The study is restricted to the book of Jeremiah and reflects upon the methodological conditions that should guide the analysis of participant-reference shifts.
Focusing on computer assisted pattern recognition the research suggests that Jeremiah's participant-reference shifts should not be understood from a diachronic perspective. Understanding the origin and function of participant-reference shifts rather from the perspective of syntax, text grammar and rhetorics proves to be more consistent with the textual evidence. With this insight participant-reference shifts no longer have to distort textual coherence.