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Signs of Masculinity

Men in Literature 1700 to the Present

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Edited by Antony Rowland, Emma Liggins and Eriks Uskalis

Masculinity is becoming an increasingly popular area of study in areas as diverse as sociology, politics and cultural studies, yet significant research is lacking into connections between masculinity and literature. Signs of Masculinity aims at beginning to fill the gap. Starting with an introduction to, and intervention within, numerous debates concerning the cultural construction of various masculinities, the volume then continues with an investigation of representations of masculinity in literature from 1700 to the present. Close readings of texts are intended to demonstrate that masculinity is not a theoretical abstract, but a definitive textual and cultural phenomenon that needs to be recognised in the study of literature. It is hoped that the wide-ranging essays, which raise numerous issues, and are written from a variety of methodological approaches, will appeal to undergraduate, postgraduates and lecturers interest in the crucial but under-researched area of masculinity.

Deep hiStories

Gender and Colonialism in Southern Africa

Series:

Edited by Wendy Woodward, Patricia Hayes and Gary Minkley

Deep hiStories represents the first substantial publication on gender and colonialism in Southern Africa in recent years, and suggests methodological ways forward for a post-apartheid and postcolonial generation of scholars. The volume’s theorizing, which is based on Southern African regional material, is certain to impact on international debates on gender – debates which have shifted from earlier feminisms towards theorizations which include sexual difference, subjectivities, colonial (and postcolonial) discourses and the politics of representation. Deep hiStories goes beyond the dichotomies which have largely characterized the discussion of women and gender in Africa, and explores alternative models of interpretation such as ‘genealogies of voice’. These ‘genealogies’ transcend the conventional binaries of visibility and invisibility, speaking and silence. Works covering South Africa from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and Zimbabwe, Namibia and Cameroon in the twentieth include:
• Colonial readings of Foucault
• Ideologies of domesticity
• Torture and testimony of slave women
• Women as missionary targets
• Gender and the public sphere
• Race, science and spectacle
• Male nursing on mines
• Infanticide, insanity and social control
• Fertility and the postcolonial state
• Literary reconstructions of the past
• Gender-blending and code-switching
• De/colonizing the queer
The collection includes diverse research on the body in Southern Africa for the first time. It brings new subtleties to the ongoing debates on culture, civility and sexuality, dealing centrally with constructions of race and whiteness in history and literature. It is an important resource for teachers and students of gender and colonial studies.

Alexa Athelstan

This chapter draws on the initial findings of my PhD research, which theorises queer, alternative and subversive feminine orientations, embodiment and subjectivity in everyday life. Using a theoretical framework of Pierre Bourdieu’s (1984) concept of the habitus, Judith Butler’s (1999) theory of gender performativity and Sara Ahmed’s (2006) queer phenomenology concerning processes of orientation, I investigate how subjects who identify their femininity as being queer, alternative or subversive, manifest their gender identity according to the affects, objects, people, spaces, aesthetics and positioned intersections of identity that they orientate themselves towards and away from. The project uses a mixed methodological approach involving a discursive analysis of three major queer feminine subcultural texts, Chloë Brushwood Rose and Anna Camilleri’s (2003) Brazen Femme, Ulrika Dahl and Del LaGrace Volcano’s (2008) Femmes of Power and Jennifer Clare Burke’s (2009) Visible: A Femmethology, as well as interviews and visual materials in the forms of collages and photographs produced by 15 queer feminine participants in the UK. This chapter explores the question of why positionalities matter for theorising queer feminine orientations. It discusses how various intersecting positionalities, including ‘race,’ ethnicity, disability, class, age, sex, gender, sexuality, size and geographical location orientate queer feminine identities, by shaping, limiting and producing specific modes of queer feminine embodiment and subjectivity.

Edited by Myriam Díaz Diocaretz

Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.