Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 283 items for :

  • All: "methodology" x
  • Art History x

Series:

Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Bilderwelten: Ägyptische Bilder und ägyptologische Kunst

Vorarbeiten für eine bildwissenschaftliche Ägyptologie

Series:

Kai Widmaier

Egyptologists have been debating for decades about whether or not Egyptian images classify as art. Nevertheless, the term ‘art’ still serves as a guiding concept for Egyptology. Kai Widmaier offers an overview of how different art-historical interpretive methods influence Egyptological research. His study demonstrates that, due to its adherence to the term art, Egyptology has considerably dissociated Egyptian images from their original contexts.
Bilderwelten combines the analysis of Egyptian images from the 6th to the 18th Dynasty with methodological reflection. This leads to both a new terminology of style as well as to an alternative approach to Egyptian images. By differentiating systematically between Egyptian images and Egyptological art, this book lays the foundation for an Egyptology that follows the path of Visual Studies instead of adhering to questionable art-historical methods.

Diane Apostolos-Cappadona

the discourse into the early decades of the twenty-first century. Given the methodologies and disciplinary vocabulary applied to the study of religion and the arts, there is the recognition of the lenses through which the audience or viewer perceives/experiences the arts. So, for example, consider the

Edited by Luke Lavan and Michael Mulryan

Archaeologists working on late antique sites have not spent enough time thinking about methodology. Their focus has been on recovering and cataloguing evidence, or on the study of specific historical problems. Digging has often been more important than publishing, which has rarely extended beyond the basic summaries found in preliminary reports. The re-emergence of clearance excavation, fuelled by the demands of tourism, has further reduced the value of urban excavations in the East Mediterranean. Here, late antique levels have suffered, in the hunt for photogenic early imperial architecture. This volume attempts to address this situation by offering a critique of present practice and a series of exemplars, alongside discussion articles on field technique and post-excavation analysis. The articles ranges from urban survey to the study of finds. The book also considers if we need to develop specific field methods appropriate to the study of late antiquity.

Contributors are John Bintliff, Jeremy Evans, Axel Gering, Stefan Groh, Yoshiki Hori, Nikolaos D. Karydis, Veli Köse, Luke Lavan, Zsolt Magyar, Philip Mills, John Pearce, Steve Roskams, Helga Sedlmayer, Ellen Swift, Itamar Taxel, Douglas Underwood, Lutgarde Vandeput and Joe Williams.

Lenka Varadzinová

– and the outline painting of a quadruped constitute later additions . Photo by Zbyněk Žába, 1963. This paper has two objectives: first, to provide an overview of recent methodological achievements of rock-art research in Egypt and Sudan as to dating and understanding the original, intentional meaning

Edited by European Association for Asian Art

The EAAA Monograph Series, entitled European Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology aims to publish in-depth, peer-reviewed scholarly contributions on topics relevant to Asian Art and Archaeology that treat these in a wider Asian context. The series endeavors to analyze and interpret the artistic and cultural heritage of ancient, modern and contemporary social realities in Asian societies, and to contribute in this way to a deeper understanding of the cultural, philosophical, political, sociological, religious and ideological values of Asia as a whole. The EAAA Series' goal is to publish innovative research that will have a lasting impact by opening new research questions, which will help trace new theoretical and methodological pathways in the field of art history.

Art History and Visual Studies in Europe

Transnational Discourses and National Frameworks

Series:

Edited by Matthew Rampley, Thierry Lenain, Hubert Locher, Andrea Pinotti, Charlotte Schoell-Glass and C.J.M. (Kitty) Zijlmans

Reflection on the history and practice of art history has long been a major topic of research and scholarship, and this volume builds on this tradition by offering a critical survey of many of the major developments in the contemporary discipline, such as the impact of digital technologies, the rise of visual studies or new initiatives in conservation theory and practice. Alongside these methodological issues this book addresses the mostly neglected question of the impact of national contexts on the development of the discipline. Taking a wide range of case studies, this book examines the impact of the specific national political, institutional and ideological demands on the practice of art history. The result is an account that both draws out common features and also highlights the differences and the plurality of practices that together constitute art history as a discipline.

Editor-in-Chief Ann-Sophie Lehmann

Brill’s Studies in Art & Materiality is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to innovative scholarship about the relation between art, materials, and making.

Artists possess knowledge about materials, their affordances and interactions, and skillfully transform materials into art objects. The resulting specific materiality of a work of art is not only an index of its making, but is also fundamentally connected to meaning, aesthetic perception, mimetic potential, economic value, cultural and social impact, as well as its endurance and preservation. Understanding these connections enhances the field of art history and opens new avenues of investigation, ranging from the focused situated study of individual materials and art objects to comparative inquiries that cross traditional boundaries between genre, time, and space. The development of salient theoretical and methodological frameworks to study the materiality of art connects art history and its sub-disciplines (technical art history, museum studies) to anthropology, history of science, archaeology, material culture studies, as well as the cognitive sciences.

The series accommodates scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and reference works that engage with the rich meanings of art works’ materiality.

The series is not restricted to a particular chronological period or geographical region, thereby allowing for a broad range of topics. In addition, the series has an interdisciplinary component, while keeping a distinct profile. As such, the series promises rich, innovative content for a wide academic readership.

Warschau

Ein Wiederaufbau, der vor dem Krieg begann

Series:

Małgorzata Popiołek-Roßkamp

Das Wiederaufbauprogramm des historischen Stadtzentrums von Warschau, in der Kunstgeschichte als ein einmaliges und einzigartiges Projekt wahrgenommen, war eine Collage europäischer Ideen der Architektur, Stadtplanung, Denkmalpflege, Moderne und Hygiene.
Der Wiederaufbau des gesamten historischen Viertels, wie er in Warschau nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg erfolgte, wurde von einem bis dato beispiellosen Ausmaß der Zerstörung erzwungen und bildete eine Ausnahmeerscheinung im europäischen Vergleich. Sucht man nach den ideologischen Wurzeln des Wiederaufbauprogramms der Warschauer Baudenkmale, wird ein deutlicher Fortbestand des städtebaulichen und architektonischen Gedankenguts aus der Vorkriegszeit sichtbar, welches insbesondere in den ersten Nachkriegsjahren zum Ausdruck kam. Die Idee der Kontinuität der Vorkriegstheorie und -praxis polnischer Architekten, die das Zentrum Warschaus wiederaufbauten, bildet die Hauptthese der vorliegenden Dissertation.