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In: How Does it Feel? Point of View in Translation
Narratology is concerned with the study of narratives; but surprisingly it does not usually distinguish between original and translated texts. This lack of distinction is regrettable. In recent years the visibility of translations and translators has become a widely discussed topic in Translation Studies; yet the issue of translating a novel’s point of view has remained relatively unexplored. It seems crucial to ask how far a translator’s choices affect the novel’s point of view, and whether characters or narrators come across similarly in originals and translations.
This book addresses exactly these questions. It proposes a method by which it becomes possible to investigate how the point of view of a work of fiction is created in an original and adapted in translation. It shows that there are potential problems involved in the translation of linguistic features that constitute point of view (deixis, modality, transitivity and free indirect discourse) and that this has an impact on the way works are translated.
Traditionally, comparative analysis of originals and their translations have relied on manual examinations; this book demonstrates that corpus-based tools can greatly facilitate and sharpen the process of comparison. The method is demonstrated using Virginia Woolf’s To The Lighthouse (1927) and The Waves (1931), and their French translations.
Catalogues of Beckett’s reading notes and other manuscripts at Trinity College Dublin, with supporting essays
Notes Diverse Holo[graph], is a special issue of Samuel Beckett Today/aujourd’hui containing catalogues of the Beckett manuscripts at Trinity College Dublin, accompanied by manuscript studies by noted Beckett specialists. It includes: - An annotated catalogue of Beckett's extensive reading notes during and following his student years at Trinity College Dublin, compiled by Everett Frost and Jane Maxwell, with introductory remarks by Everett Frost. It provides new material for Beckett's studies of philosophy, psychology, and literature, including Geulincx, Dante, Mauthner, and Goethe; - A catalogue by Jane Maxwell listing all the remaining Beckett manuscript holdings at Trinity College Dublin, including drafts of works in progress and the correspondence with Thomas McGreevy and Barbara Bray; - Manuscript studies by John Pilling, Daniela Caselli, Lois Overbeck, and others.
DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.



The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Displacement, Memory, and Travel in Contemporary Migrant Writing examines contemporary cultural representations of transforming identities in the era of increasing global mobility. It pays particular attention to the ways in which cultural encounters are experienced affectively and discursively in migrant literature. Divided into three parts that deal with refugee writing and displacement, migration and memory, and new European identities, the volume develops current methodologies and shows how postcolonial studies can be applied to the study of cultural encounters. Writers studied include Simão Kikamba, Ishmael Beah, Madhur Jaffrey, Diana Abu-Jaber, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Caryl Phillips, Jamal Mahjoub, and Monica Ali, and several refugee writers.
Configuring Masculinity in Theory and Literary Practice combines a critical survey of the most current developments in the emergent field of Masculinity Studies with both a historical overview of how masculinity has been constructed within British Literature from the Middle Ages to the present and a special focus on developments in the 20th and 21st centuries.
The volume combines seminal articles on the most important concepts in Masculinity Studies by acknowledged experts such as Raewyn Connell, Todd Reeser, and Richard Collier with new and innovative analyses of key British literary texts combining Literary and Cultural Studies approaches with those currently deployed in Masculinity Studies, Gender Studies, Legal Studies, Postcolonial Studies as well as methodologies derived from sociology.
Kathryn Ambrose offers a new approach to the Woman Question in mid- to late-nineteenth-century English, German and Russian literature. Using a methodological framework based on feminist theory and post-structuralism, she provides a re-vision of canonical texts (such as Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Middlemarch, Effi Briest, Fathers and Children and Anna Karenina) alongside lesser-known works by Emily and Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Theodor Storm, Theodor Fontane, Ivan Turgenev and Leo Tolstoy. Her exploration of the semiotics of barriers – as opposed to the established approach of the semiotics of space – makes for a rewarding reading of this period of literature and establishes new cross-cultural and literary connections between the three countries.
Through the great diversity of topics and methodologies the essays in this volume make a seminal contribution to an under-researched field at the intersection of literary and cultural criticism, comparative literature, and theatre as well as translation studies. The essays cover a wide range of texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. From a broad variety of perspectives the exchange between drama and theatre of the Anglophone and the Germanophone worlds and their mutual influence are explored. While there is a focus on the successful or unsuccessful bridging of the cultural gaps, due consideration is given to the nexus between intercultural translation and mise en scène as well as the intricacies of intermedial reshaping. Always placing the analyses within the political and socio-historical contexts the essays make an innovative contribution to the aesthetics of Anglo-German theatrical exchange as well as to European cultural history.
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.