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Mark J. Cartledge

Kim, noted a number of themes or topics published by the journal. He suggests that a range of methodologies can be employed for an engagement with church, academy and society but a discussion of empirical research methods is conspicuous by its absence. 37 Despite this omission, empirical research

Shimon Gesundheit

The purpose of this paper is to address a pressing hermeneutical and methodological question: does textual content take precedence over historical context, or vice versa? Should scholars approach a text in light of the hypothesized historical setting, or should they rather leave considerations of

Seeking the Favor of God

Volume 2: The Development of Penitential Prayer in Second Temple Judaism

Series:

Mark Boda, Richard Falk and Rodney Werline

The essays collected in this volume investigate the development of prayers of penitence within Jewish literature of the Hellenistic and Roman periods. The book provides a critical overview of the present state of research on these prayers, and leading experts in the field use a variety of methodologies to investigate afresh various texts from the Hebrew Bible, apocryphal (deuterocanonical) and pseudepigraphical works, and the Qumran corpus in order to provide new insights into this prayer tradition. Contributors include Russell C. D. Arnold, Esther G. Chazon, Daniel K. Falk, LeAnn Snow Flesher, Michael H. Floyd, Judith H. Newman, Bilhah Nitzan, Eileen Schuller, Pieter M. Venter, and Rodney A. Werline.

Seeking the Favor of God includes three volumes covering the origins, development, and impact of penitential prayer in Second Temple Judaism.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Alisha Pomazon

Introduction During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, Hermann Cohen fought for the establishment of the academic authority and legitimacy of Jewish studies in the German academy by trying to formulate an academically rigorous methodology for the study of Judaism and the

Seeking the Favor of God

Volume 1: The Origins of Penitential Prayer in Second Temple Judaism

Series:

Mark Boda, Richard Falk and Rodney Werline

The emergence of penitential prayer represents a significant formal shift in the prayer tradition of Israel. The essays collected in this volume investigate the beginnings of penitential prayer literature in the Hebrew Bible in the Babylonian and Persian periods. The contributors offer a fresh look at various aspects of the shift from communal lament to penitential prayer as well as the relationship between them, in the process applying new approaches and methodologies to such questions as the meaning and importance of confession to penitential prayer and the necessity of penitential prayer as a prequel to repentance. The contributors are Samuel Balentine, Richard J. Bautch, Mark J. Boda, Michael Duggan, Judith Gärtner, Katherine M. Hayes, Jay C. Hogewood, William Morrow, Dalit Rom-Shiloni, and Rodney A. Werline.
Seeking the Favor of God includes three volumes covering the origins, development and impact of penitential prayer in Second Temple Judaism.

Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Steven T. Katz

METHODOLOGY IN BASSER'S STUDIES Steven T. Katz Boston University Dr. Herbert Basser is a learned scholar at home in the entire range of Jewish rabbinic sources from the classical to the contem- porary era. In the present work he seeks to bring this learning to bear on issues in the early

Learning by Doing

Being a Public Theologian in the Debate on Ageing

Frits de Lange

it took shape in the process of engaging myself in the debate. I learned by doing, on the move I became aware of a few essential methodological guidelines, which I would like to present here. The ‘graying’ of European societies represents a big challenge for the coming century. 1 The number of

Richard Hidary

a fresh reading of the story of Rabbi Simeon bar Yohai (Rashbi) hiding in a cave. Considering that so many scholars have written about this story using historical, literary, and comparative methodologies, it is a noteworthy accomplishment for Siegal to contribute a significantly new reading of this

Ari Finkelstein

history which do not rely on the historicity of the events depicted in ancient histories.” 3 In his recent book, Rewriting Ancient Jewish History , Tropper offers us a methodological reading of Josephus which emphasizes the credibility of sources, the genre of the work, and eschews parallel accounts by

In the medieval, late medieval and pre-modern world of Islam, Muslims, Jews and Christians constituted a unique cultural and intellectual commonality. They shared a language, Arabic (and at times Persian), which they spoke in daily life and which they also used for their theological, philosophical, legal and scientific writings. Moreover, they often read the same books, so that a continuous, multi-dimensional exchange of ideas, texts, and forms of discourse was the norm rather than the exception.While this has been amply demonstrated for some selected periods and regions, scholars usually opt for a one-dimensional approach with an (often exclusive) focus on either Muslim, Jewish or Christian authors and their writings.
The journal Intellectual History of the Islamicate World provides a forum for research that systematically crosses the boundaries between three major disciplines of academia and research, viz. Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies and the study of Eastern Christianity. It encourages discussion among representatives of these and related disciplines, with a view to promoting a new understanding of intellectual history in all its facets throughout the Islamicate World, from its emergence until modern times and from different methodological perspectives. The Intellectual History of the Islamicate World covers such themes as philosophy, theology, exegesis, law and legal methodology, sciences and medicine.
The Intellectual History of the Islamicate World is double blind peer-reviewed. From 2017 onwards it will publish three issues per year. In addition to predefined theme volumes, the journal accepts submissions relevant to its overall concerns but not bound to a specific theme. Moreover, from 2017 there will be a review section. All submissions and queries should be addressed to the editor-in-chief at scs@ias.edu. Further details can be found on the journal’s website: www.brill.com/ihiw.

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