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Tíeken

the Kura tribe. The first part ends with the kuratti ’s prediction that the woman will marry the king that very same day. In the second part, the scene shifts from the capital city or temple town to the countryside, where we meet the kuratti ’s husband and his friend, a kuluvan hunter. The former is

Pierre H. L. Eggermont

T H E O R I G I N O F T H E ~ A K A - E R A by PIERRE H. L. EGGERMONT Hengelo (0.) I. THE PREDICTION OF THE DURATION OF THE LAW BY THE BUDDHA I n the 5th y e a r after the I l l u m i n a t i o n B u d d h a ' s f a t h e r S u d d h o d a n a died a n d in c o n n e c t i o n with this the B u

Tieken

away a friend as a messenger to the king, a fortune-teller enters, a kuratti , or a woman of the Kura tribe. The first part ends with the kuratti ’s prediction that the woman will marry the king that very same day. In the second part, the scene shifts from the capital city or temple town to the

Donald Nelson

~nika (verse 268), and virtually all narrative concerning the marriages has been removed at this point. When will the prediction he is to be emperor o f Vidy~idharas come true, Narav~hanadatta asks ~at~nika (271). When Narav~hanadatta has subdued the entire Vidy~dhara kingdom on Silver Mountain (272), ~at

C. M. Mayrhofer

Nanda's (or U p a n a n d a ' s - the names o f the cooks in this version) prediction tad vidyFtdharacakrasya cakravartr bhavis.yati/ jyais.t.hacandrasahasr~m, gudrrgh~yug ceti nau mati.h// ' T h e r e f o r e he will be cakravartin o f the race o f vidyddharas. We think he has the t h o u s a n d rays

U. Roesler

paracanonical P¯ali texts, but not in the P¯ali canon, a fact that points to a chrono- logical development that is not determined by school affiliations. The same applies to the motif of the light rays of the Buddha when he smiles when making a prediction (see pp. 68f.). 4 I will not go into details but

Menon

to predict either phonologically or morphologically the combinations of past tense suffixes and the verb stems. The only possible morphological prediction is to make an exhaustive taxonomic list of verb stems and to state the past tense suffixes which go along with them. Even here one is confronted

S. Adhami

is the profession of the “theologians” to announce the appearance of the Fortunate One before his actual arrival. The prediction can be done by consulting the heavens and the movements of the stars, topics which are dealt with in the ensuing passage. The passage ( DkB 328.7–15) is concerned with the

Tieken

that the prophesy or prediction made by the holy man referred to above, is an entirely different thing from a curse uttered in anger in retribution for an error or offence committed. The absence of characters from mythology and, with them, that of the curse, becomes all the more conspicuous if we turn

Walter Slaje

) the actually pronounced statement about a fact in past or present, possessing a certain energetic power to effect a change to the better [ . . . ]; (3) a prediction ( promise or vow, etc.) of any kind, i.e., a F true statement _ concerning the future, [ . . . ] ^ . 27 On the word-formation of sat