Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Literature, Arts & Science x

Series:

Edited by Herbert Rowland

The present volume is the first to address the interrelationship between Goethe’s scientific thought and work, his ideas on art and literary oeuvre, and chaos and complexity theories. The eleven studies assembled in it treat one or more elements or aspects of this interrelationship, ranging from basic concepts all the way to a model of an aesthetic-scientific methodology. In the process, the authors scrutinize chaos and complexity both as motif and motor of literary texts and nature within various contexts of past and present. The volume should be of interest to literary scholars, scientists, and philosophers of science, indeed, to all those who are interested in the continuities between the humanities and sciences, culture and nature.

This Thing of Darkness

Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness

Series:

Edited by Richard Hamilton and Margaret Sönser Breen

Written across the disciplines of art history, literature, philosophy, sociology, and theology, the ten essays comprising the collection all insist on multidimensional definitions of evil.
Taking its title from a moment in Shakespeare’s Tempest when Prospero acknowledges his responsibility for Caliban, this collection explores the necessarily ambivalent relationship between humanity and evil. To what extent are a given society’s definitions of evil self-serving? Which figures are marginalized in the process of identifying evil? How is humanity itself implicated in the production of evil? Is evil itself something fundamentally human? These questions, indicative of the kinds of issues raised in this collection, seem all the more pressing in light of recent world events.
The ten essays were originally presented at the First Global Conference on Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness, held in March 2000 in Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University.

Experimental Practices

Technoscience, Literature, Art, Philosophy

Edited by Manuela S. Rossini, Stephan Besser and Ines Kleesattel

This book series seeks to develop the status of science, art, literature and philosophy as truly experimental practices, each of which regularly borrows from the others in order to further its drive to invention and innovation. This implies an understanding of the arts as research: i.e. as a particular form of knowledge production and practice among many others.

In recent years, these exchanges are being shaped by new challenges and research perspectives: Due to a heightened awareness of the limits of anthropocentric categories of analysis in times of climate change and the technological encroachment upon the living, the critical humanities have forged alliances with technoscience and experts outside academia to tackle the most pressing global issues. Increasing disciplinary entanglements give rise to all kinds of hybrids like the environmental humanities, the digital humanities, the medical humanities or the neurohumanities – all of which can be subsumed under the label “posthumanities”. This requires new experimental approaches and collaborations as well as reflection on experimental practices, their impact, history and creative epistemic potential.

The series therefore accommodates work at the intersections of the humanities, technoscience and the arts. Taking “experimentation” as the common practice, topic and aim of the series, the editors invite single-authored volumes or collections of 15-20 essays around a specific concept or theme that contribute and enact a practice-based as well as theory-driven poetics of knowledge. Proceedings are only considered if there have been pre-selections, a multidisciplinary authorship, and if there is an overall coherence and dialogue between the individual contributions.

The series is committed to include relevant work presented at the meetings of the Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts (both its international one and, in particular, its European branch, see: slsa-eu.org) and we especially encourage books that are co-authored by an artist/writer or a scientist together with a scholar from the humanities.

Series:

Nathalie Roelens

Tout le monde en conviendra : lire n'est pas une activité de tout repos. La vue y est certes sollicitée, et même d'emblée, mais c'est pour aussitôt s'éclipser. S'il était purement vu, le texte (dans son sens étendu d'objet de l'interprétation) ne serait pas encore lu. La lecture proprement dite aura lieu dès l'instant où je cesse de voir ce qui m'est donné à voir pour me faufiler au-delà. J'embrasse à présent une réalité tri-dimensionnelle, je deviens le texte et le texte m'épouse, je flaire et je ressens, j'hallucine et je jubile, bref : je lis. La lecture sera synesthésique ou ne sera pas. Mon voyeurisme n'est plus trivial mais absolu. Or ce don de voyance que je m'accorde pour pallier mon aveuglement du départ n'est pas sans risques : je ne suis à l'abri ni de la méprise ni de la foi aveugle. Et c'est là le côté ironique de toute lecture. On a beau s'investir dans l'oeuvre, tôt ou tard l'enchantement sera rompu. Je me vois en train de lire, donc je ne lis plus. Le texte me renvoie soudain à mes propres limites. Il n'empêche que cet ébranlement du sujet soit souvent déclencheur d'une expérience esthétique, expérience qui porte également un enseignement : la lecture aujourd'hui engage quiconque s'y adonne à être prêt à abdiquer à chaque instant ou, du moins, à respecter l'illisible et l'inappropriable.
L'aboutissement de ce travail ce confond avec son présupposé majeur : inutile de vouloir maintenir le clivage entre lecture textuelle et lecture tout court (d'une image, du monde, d'un corps désiré, etc.), ce sont leurs empiètements qui restituent à ce geste ancestral et sans doute universel son souffle et son ampleur. Des scènes de perception entravée, lacunaire ou défectueuse, glanées dans le patrimoine littéraire et plastique contemporain (Proust, Cocteau, Michaux, Calvino, Manganelli, De Chirico, Alechinsky, Fuentes, Biély, Nabokov, Gombrowicz et tant d'autres) et appréhendées comme autant de simulacres de l'expérience de lecture, nous ont permis de cerner l'activité lectorielle au plus proche des textes.