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Series:

Mark Abel

What is the relationship between music and time? How does musical rhythm express our social experience of time? In Groove: An Aesthetic of Measured Time, Mark Abel explains the rise to prominence in Western music of a new way of organising rhythm: groove. He provides a historical account of its emergence around the turn of the twentieth century, and analyses the musical components which make it work.
Tracing the influence of key philosophical arguments about the nature of time on musical aesthetics, Mark Abel draws on materialist interpretations of art and culture to challenge those, like Adorno, who criticise popular music’s metrical regularity. He concludes that groove does not simply reflect the temporality of contemporary society, but, by incorporating abstract time into its very structure, is capable of effecting a critique of it.

The Early History of Embodied Cognition 1740-1920

The Lebenskraft-Debate and Radical Reality in German Science, Music, and Literature

Series:

Edited by John A. McCarthy

This pioneering book evaluates the early history of embodied cognition. It explores for the first time the life-force ( Lebenskraft) debate in Germany, which was manifest in philosophical reflection, medical treatise, scientific experimentation, theoretical physics, aesthetic theory, and literary practice esp. 1740-1920. The history of vitalism is considered in the context of contemporary discourses on radical reality (or deep naturalism). We ask how animate matter and cognition arise and are maintained through agent-environment dynamics (Whitehead) or performance (Pickering). This book adopts a nonrepresentational approach to studying perception, action, and cognition, which Anthony Chemero designated radical embodied cognitive science. From early physiology to psychoanalysis, from the microbiome to memetics, appreciation of body and mind as symbiotically interconnected with external reality has steadily increased. Leading critics explore here resonances of body, mind, and environment in medical history (Reil, Hahnemann, Hirschfeld), science (Haller, Goethe, Ritter, Darwin, L. Büchner), musical aesthetics (E.T.A. Hoffmann, Wagner), folklore (Grimm), intersex autobiography (Baer), and stories of crime and aberration (Nordau, Döblin). Science and literature both prove to be continually emergent cultures in the quest for understanding and identity. This book will appeal to intertextual readers curious to know how we come to be who we are and, ultimately, how the Anthropocene came to be.

Selected Essays on Intermediality by Werner Wolf (1992–2014)

Theory and Typology, Literature-Music Relations, Transmedial Narratology, Miscellaneous Transmedial Phenomena

Series:

Werner Wolf

Edited by Walter Bernhart

This volume collects twenty-two major essays by Werner Wolf published between 1992 and 2014, all of them revised but retaining the original argument. They form the core of those seminal writings which have contributed to establishing 'intermediality' as an internationally recognized research field, besides providing a by now widely accepted typology of the field and opening intermedial perspectives on areas as varied as narratology, metareferentiality and iconicity. The essays are presented chronologically under the headings of “Theory and Typology”, “Literature–Music Relations”, “Transmedial Narratology”, and “Miscellaneous Transmedial Phenomena” and cover a wide spectrum of topics of both historical and contemporary relevance, ranging from J.S. Bach, Mozart, Schubert and Gulda through Sterne, Hardy, Woolf and Beckett to Jan Steen, Hogarth, Magritte and comics. The volume should be essential reading for scholars of literature, music and art history with an interdisciplinary orientation as well as general readers interested in the fascinating interaction of the arts.

Series:

Werner Wolf

Abstract

[In recent decades ‘classical’, i. e. structuralist narratology has given way to various ‘post-classical’ attempts to update narratology. Using the example of mise en cadre as a complement to the well-known, originally narratological concept mise en abyme, the present essay aims to show that ‘neo-classical’ narratology deserves a prominent place among these various attempts. After a short review of the main variants of current post-classical narratology and a positioning of the present essay within this context, intermedial and frame-theoretical approaches are discussed as a basis for the analysis of mise en cadre. This is followed by a detailed explanation of mise en cadre as a ’top-down’ construction of similarity within a text or artefact; illustrations include J. Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and M. Shelley’s Frankenstein. As a complement to mise en cadre, mise en reflet (or mise en série), i. e. the construction of similarities on the same level as in E.A. Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, is introduced as an additional counterpart to mise en abyme, before the methodological question of how to become aware of initial mises en cadre is discussed, various forms of mise en cadre (initial and terminal) are mentioned and the relevance of this device beyond narratives is demonstrated with an example from the visual arts: C.D. Friedrich’s Tetschen Altar. The concluding section addresses the question as to why yet another neologism should be introduced in the study of literature and other media and why post-classical narratology is a valuable continuation of the project of classical narratology.] 


Series:

Werner Wolf

Abstract

[This essay is one of the earliest systematic attempts to transcend a mono- or intramedial narratology in the direction of an inter- or transmedial one, using as a point of departure general parts of literary narratology. After a survey of the present, unsatisfactory state of affairs, which includes an often fuzzy use of the term ‘narrative’ (part 1), an intermedially applicable theory of narrativity is presented (part 2). In its first section (2.1.), as a result of a discussion of the nature of narrative, its main functions and extra-compositional as well as intracompositional factors, frame theory and prototype theory are proposed as basic approaches. The second section (2.2.) gives a general survey of the main elements and levels of an intermedial narratological model. The third section (2.3.) concentrates on specific stimuli which are able to trigger the frame ‘narrative’. Most important among them are the prototypical features of narratives, so-called ‘narremes’ (which include basic ‘qualitative’, content, and syntactic ‘narremes’). These ‘narremes’ are illustrated with reference to the genre of fairy tales (“Bluebeard” in particular) as a prototypical case of narrativity. Part 3 is dedicated to the narrative potential of the visual arts. It gives a survey of some aspects and problems of art-historical narratology and discusses the (limited) narrative potential of single pictures (represented, in the variant of the polyphase picture, by Benozzo Gozzoli’s “Salome’s Dance and the Beheading of John the Baptist”, and, in the variant of the monophase picture, by John Cousen’s steel engraving of Arthur Hughes’ “Ophelia”). Picture series, which possess a greater narrative potential, are also addressed, using the example of William Hogarth’s Marriage A-la-Mode. Part 4 is dedicated to yet another medium, namely (instrumental) music. After some general reflections on musical semantics and the limited possibilities of ‘pure’ music to point beyond itself, the second movement of Beethoven’s Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 4 in G major is shown to be able to elicit at least some narrativity, albeit in reduced and very vague form. In conclusion (part 5) various media are compared to each other in a summary way with reference to their degree of narrative potentials.] 


Series:

Werner Wolf

Abstract

[One of the consequences of the increasing importance of interdisciplinarity (which is a precondition for intermediality studies) is the appearance of terms and concepts in individual disciplines which have been ‘imported’ from other disciplines and have originally also been applied to other phenomena. It is the main aim of the present essay to discuss the chances and problems of such terminological and conceptual ‘imports’ and ‘exports’. The main example chosen here is the originally narratological concept of ‘metalepsis’, which designates paradoxical transgressions between (onto-)logical levels or ‘worlds’ (the essay thus is also a contribution to metalepsis research and aims at expanding the relevance of this concept). After a clarification of the conditions under which terminological and conceptual exports/imports make sense, the notion ‘metalepsis’ is clarified, and its transmedial and transgeneric nature is subsequently illustrated with reference to fields beyond fictional narratives, namely comics, and (non-narrative examples from) the visual arts. The conclusion answers the question of why exporting concepts such as ‘metalepsis’ to fields outside narratology matters. It must be stressed that the export(ability) of a narratological concept such as metalepsis into other domains highlighted here is only one possible example which may be complemented by others, including meaningful ‘imports’ from other domains into narratology.]


Series:

Werner Wolf

Abstract

[The fact that we humans are story-telling animals and that stories can be realized by more media than the classic case of verbal narration are by now established ideas that no longer require further belabouring in research. However, what has not yet been researched sufficiently is the following question: owing to what clues are we actually encouraged to apply a narrative frame in the reception of a given artefact or work, be it of a verbal, visual or acoustic nature? The present contribution purports to find answers to this question with reference to literary and pictorial narratives. Its premise is the frame-theoretical idea that narrative is a major cognitive frame whose application is elicited by certain clues, keys or ‘framings’, typically and preferably at the outset of the reception process. Obviously, in verbal texts, these framings are different (and can be restricted to initial discursive formulae) from clues offered by visual representations, which seem to rely much more on content elements (in particular on representations eliciting certain scripts that are easily narrativized). The essay enquires into the media-specific triggers of narrativity which operate at the beginning of respective reception processes and elicit narrative readings. Examples from the pictorial arts and literature include paintings by Jan Steen, William Hogarth’s dyptich “Before and After” and the beginning of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as well as texts by E.A. Poe, Samuel Coleridge and Gabriel Josipovici. The comparative, transmedial perspective chosen in the contribution offers fresh insights into the importance of media for narrativization from a cognitive angle.] 


Series:

Israel Katz

Henry George Farmer (1882-1965) was a pioneering musicologist who specialized in Arab music. In 1932, he participated in the First International Congress of Arab Music in Cairo, during which he maintained a journal recording his daily activities, interactions with fellow delegates and dignitaries, and varied perambulations throughout the city. This journal, and the detailed minutes he kept for his chaired Commission on History and Manuscripts, were never published. They reveal aspects and inner-workings of the Congress that have hitherto remained unknown. The illustrations and photos contained therein, as well as additional photos that were never seen, provide visual documentation of the Congress’s participants and musical ensembles.

Series:

Lawrence Kramer

Edited by Richard Leppert and Walter Bernhart

tranquil, often playful consideration of the problem of loss as presented by Orpheus, and it has an elegiac voice, full of lament and desire, that uses the Orpheus myth to utter “hidden syllables” of personal sorrow. These two voices are always moving in opposite directions. The elegiac voice, which is to