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Nicolás Bas Martín

would present him with a list of works sent to be reviewed by the censors. These were manuscripts that had been submitted by their authors (most of whom were actually translators) or by the booksellers concerned, acting as editors and reviewers prior to approval by the censors. In the latter case, the

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Nicolás Bas Martín and Andy Birch

despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way; in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the

Series:

Nicolás Bas Martín and Andy Birch

would present him with a list of works sent to be reviewed by the censors. These were manuscripts that had been submitted by their authors (most of whom were actually translators) or by the booksellers concerned, acting as editors and reviewers prior to approval by the censors. In the latter case, the

Series:

Nicolás Bas Martín

In Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London) Nicolás Bas examines the image of Spain in eighteenth-century Europe, and in Paris and London in particular. His material has been scoured from an exhaustive interrogation of the records of the book trade. He refers to booksellers’ catalogues, private collections, auctions, and other sources of information in order to reconstruct the country’s cultural image. Rarely have these sources been searched for Spanish books, and never have they been as exhaustively exploited as they are in Bas’ book.
Both England and France were conversant with some very negative ideas about Spain. The Black Legend, dating back to the sixteenth century, condemned Spain as repressive and priest-ridden. Bas shows however, that an alternative, more sympathetic, vision ran parallel with these negative views. His bibliographical approach brings to light the Spanish books that were bought, sold and ultimately read. The impression thus obtained is likely to help us understand not only Spain’s past, but also something of its present.

Series:

Nicolás Bas Martín

despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way; in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the