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The Socratic Problem

The History - The Solutions. From the18th Century to the present time; 61 extracts from 54 authors in their historical context

M. Montuori

This work is intended to offer to anyone still intending to devote himself to the Socratic problem a reliable means of approach by providing, first of all, a complete history of the problem itself, from its first appearance during Socrates' lifetime up to the present day. The book provides not only the history of the problem, but also the essential documents, accompanied by brief explana-tory and bibliographical contextual notes, to be read in counterpoint with the chapters of its history. These documents consist of 61 extracts from 54 authors, from Fréret onwards, in other words, from the beginning of the history of the problem of the socratic sources, which arose in the Age of Enlightenment, down to the present day. These extracts are not intended to form a collection of the various representations, interpretations or images of Socrates which succeeded each other in the history of socratic historiography; instead, the aim is to present, in a logically and chronologically consistent order, the various ways in which the problem of the sources of Socratism was presented and resolved in the course of two hundred years of study and research on the 'case' of Socrates.

Prolegomena Mathematica

From Apollonius of Perga to the Late Neoplatonism. With an Appendix on Pappus and the History of Platonism

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Jaap Mansfeld

This is the first study to deal with the history of Greek mathematics - starting with Appollonius and including astronomy - as part of the history of literary culture. It attempts to find out how mathematical works were presented by original authors (e.g. Ptolemy), and introduced and explained by commentators (e.g. Pappus who is at the centre of this enquiry, Eutocius, and prolegomena by late Anonymi). The manner in which mathematical treatises were presented and studied is entirely comparable to that practised in e.g. philosophy, medicine, biblical and literary studies (see the author's Prolegomena, ( Brill, 1994)). Discussion of introductory issues is a standard feature, and in mathematics the development from the implicitly expressed to the explicitly expressed and from there to scholastic routine is the same as in these other fields.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the twenty-eighth year of published proceedings, contains seven papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2011-12. The paper topics include: stages of early Greek cosmology, the decline of political virtue in Republic 8-9, two dogmas of Platonism, Meno's paradox and Sisyphus, puzzles and perplexity in Plato's dialogues, Nous and its objects in Aristotle, and Plotinus' Socratic intellectualism.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the twenty-ninth year of published proceedings, contains six papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2012-13. The paper topics include: Glaucon's fate in the Republic, divine creation and human responsibility in the Timaeus, Aristotle on orexis in generation, on the biological use of analogy and finally on dialectic as proto-phenomenological, and lastly, Proclus on likeness and unlikeness as ontological first principles.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the twenty-seventh year of published proceedings, contains seven papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2010-11. The paper topics include: number in Philolaus, the injustice of philosophers in Republic VII, Socrates' and Plato's political art in the Gorgias, Aristotle's distinction between two types of knowledge in the Ethics, medical analogies and aporias in Aristotle's account of natural science, place in Aristotle's Physics, and Plotinus' use of light for image and analogy.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the twenty-seventh year of published proceedings, contains seven papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2010-11. The paper topics include: number in Philolaus, the injustice of philosophers in Republic VII, Socrates' and Plato's political art in the Gorgias, Aristotle's distinction between two types of knowledge in the Ethics, medical analogies and aporias in Aristotle's account of natural science, place in Aristotle's Physics, and Plotinus' use of light for image and analogy.

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Edited by Robert Sharples

This volume forms part of the large international Theophrastus project started by Brill in 1992 and edited by W.W. Fortenbaugh, R.W. Sharples and D. Gutas . Together with volumes comprising the texts and translations, the commentary volumes provide a new generation of classicists with an up-to-date collection of the fragments and testimonia relating to Theophrastus (c. 370-288/5 B.C), Aristotle's pupil and successor as head of the Lyceum.
In the present volume, the focus is on natural philosophy, apart from the study of living things. Topics covered include the principles of scientific enquiry, place, time, motion, the heavens, the sublunary world, meteorology and the study of materials.

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Edited by John J. Cleary and Gary Gurtler

With one notable exception, this volume contains papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2006-7. That exception is the colloquium in which Alasdair MacIntyre offers a fresh reading of Plato's Republic. Indeed, most of the papers included in this volume discuss a wide range of topics related to Plato, for instance, the dangers of misology in the Phaedo, the Socratic use of rhetoric in the Gorgias, Plato's anti-hedonism in the Philebus, the link between mythical and logical thinking in the Symposium, and Heidegger's interpretation of Plato's concept of truth. But, apart from this obsession with Plato, there are two colloquia devoted to the Epicurean notion of preconception and to the Stoic conception of the good, respectively.

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Edited by John J. Cleary and Gary Gurtler

This volume contains papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2005-6. Of the two colloquia on Neoplatonism, one offers a phenomenological reading of Plotinus on the Intellect, while the other discusses consciousness and introspection in Plotinus and Augustine. With regard to Aristotle’s ethics, one colloquium discusses the influence of force and compulsion on human action, while another examines his views on the relationship between external goods and happiness. Two other colloquia are devoted to Aristotle’s Metaphysics, discussing form and function in relation to his theory of substance, as well as his paradigmatism. Finally, a single colloquium on Plato discusses the happiness of philosopher-kings in the Republic.

Parmenides beyond the Gates

The Divine Revelation on Being, Thinking, and the Doxa

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Meijer

One of the main problems in the the study of Parmenides’ poem is establishing the meaning of e‰nai, ‘to be’. Scholars often simply take it to mean: ‘to exist’, ‘to be the case’, ‘to be so’, or regard it as a copula. It’s better to start by fathoming what Parmenides himself has to say about to be and about Being. This cannot be done without recognizing the logical pattern in his poem. Another main problem is: what does not-Being mean? Is the so-called Doxa - as not-Being - a non-existing, hallucinatory world, an illusion, a fata morgana? Or is it only a detector of lies? In the present work the view will be advocated that the Doxa offers the description of a really existing world. A specific merit of this book is that all the problems involved will be examined in continuous debate with what scholars have offered as solutions so far.