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Historiography has long considered states and other organizations central actors in the making of history. Migrants, men and women and sometimes children, cross state borders in pursuit of life-projects or, at the minimum, of secure incomes – option the state of birth does not provide. Involuntary migrants, refugees, exiles, those escaping natural disasters also cross borders. So do forced migrants from slaves and indentured servants in the past, to trafficked human beings in the present. All use their agency to re-establish life-courses, re-unite with family, re-construct social networks or innovatively create new ones. Migrants change statewide history by withdrawing their capabilities from one unsatisfactory polity and adding it to another. They seek options to invest their human capital; they never hoped for unlimited opportunities. Migration history is political history. It is also economic history – the 17th- and 18th-century world system, the plantation belt and extractive industries in particular, would not have existed without forced migration of slaves and voluntary migration of the owners of capital. States militarily sustained this order. In the present whole states are dependent on migrants’ remittances, other societies on the caregiving labor of migrants. Which economic and political regimes force women and men to depart, which attract them? Migration is and has been global, macro-regional, micro-regional – the levels interact across continents. Migrants’ lives and the societies they change or, even, create, are transcultural.
The peer-reviewed book series Studies in Global Migration History emphasizes research that addresses agency that neither begins nor ends in only one state. It intends to replace traditional centeredness on Europe by perspectives including all macro-regions of the world and movements between them. It privileges interdisciplinary approaches and studies of uneven developments of societies and regions. It focusses on agency ‘from below’ within constraint frames and option provided by economic and stateside frames as well as by new and old elites.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor Dirk Hoerder or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

This is a subseries of Studies in Global Social History.

recognised in recent debates scrutinising the artificial boundaries between categories. 11 This introduction provides a helicopter view of the history of ngo activity in West-European migration governance in the period from the 1860s until the present day in all four policy domains, as well as those

In: Journal of Migration History

individually based. Consequently, social memory is strengthened through the use of written local historical source material whereas the present is understood through the personal interpretation of the past and earlier occurrences. In treating memory as a cultural rather than an individual faculty, Connerton

In: Journal of Migration History

the Finnish Language and Culture from the 1890s to 1920s 160 Juha Meriläinen Volume 5, no. 2 Articles ngo s and West European Migration Governance (1860s until Present): Introduction to a Special Issue 189 Marlou Schrover, Teuntje Vosters and Irial Glynn Non-Governmental Organisations and Legitimacy

In: Journal of Migration History

Fund and Greek National Resources (2012–2015). 4 We will try to present the variety of relations and collaborations that icem established with national and international stakeholders. 2 The Impetus for Global Regulation Mark Mazower’s inspirational account of the birth and expansion of a

In: Journal of Migration History

What students in Yugoslavia and their international peers had in common was their rebellion against existing socio-political structures and the conservatism of the post-war order. The Yugoslav students presented a broad left-wing critique, in this case of a system that considered itself socialist. They

In: Journal of Migration History

voluntarily. According to Philip Curtin, the decision to migrate there could only have been motivated by a ‘deadly mix of ignorance and coercion’. 6 The present article contributes to the literature by studying the economic incentives that craftsmen employed by the Royal African Company (hereafter: rac

In: Journal of Migration History

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. 14 There are almost no publications that focus solely on Swedish refugee relief NGOs. In the 1970s Helmut Müssener 15 and Lindberg presented findings about some organisations, mainly based on unpublished papers by students who had used the

In: Journal of Migration History

Directive on the right to Family reunification from the beginning of 2000 to September 2003. 3 After two years the Belgian Presidency concluded that the Council had reached a deadlock and asked the Commission to present a new proposal, including the compromises that had been achieved and solutions for

In: Journal of Migration History

Muslim Population in the Middle East and of the warm welcome the Palestinians received in Chile. 5 Academic studies usually present more conservative numbers. Xavier Abu-Eid estimated that the number of Palestinian descendants in Chile ranges between 100,000 and 300,000 people. 6 Cecilia Baeza

In: Journal of Migration History