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Series:

Candan Badem

The Crimean War was a defining event in both European and Ottoman history, but it has principally been studied from the Europeans’ point of view. This study analyzes the role of the Ottoman Empire in the Crimean War and the War’s impact on the Ottoman state and Ottoman society. Based on hitherto unused Ottoman and Russian sources, it offers new insights into the Crimean War’s financial, social and political implications for the Empire, emphasizing the importance of the Ottomans as both actors and victims. In addition to analyzing Ottoman and European public opinion and the diplomatic, economic and political origins of the War, The Ottoman Crimean War (1853-1856) also contains a critical review of the voluminous existing literature on the subject.


Series:

Jan Schmidt

From as early as the 1600s, Dutch scholars and scholarship have displayed a keen interest in the studies of the Islamic world. Over the centuries, they have collected a wealth of source texts in various languages, Turkish texts being prominent among them.
The present catalogue is the fourth and final volume in a series that covers the Turkish manuscripts preserved in public libraries and museums in the Netherlands. The volume gives a detailed description of Turkish manuscripts in minor Dutch collections, found in libraries and museums in Amsterdam, Groningen, The Hague, Leiden, Rotterdam and Utrecht, which hitherto have received little or no attention.

Legitimizing the Order

The Ottoman Rhetoric of State Power

Series:

Hakan T. Karateke and Maurus Reinkowski

A dynasty that ruled for more than six centuries certainly developed many strategies to confront “legitimacy crises” and undertook various endeavors to legitimize their rule.
After the introduction that establishes a theoretical framework for examining the Ottoman state’s legitimacy, the present volume deploys into three sections. “The Well-Founded Order” deals with the question of how the Ottomans imagined the order of their polity and how they tried to live up to this self-representation.
“Religiosity and Orthodoxy” turns to the question of religiosity and orthodoxy as defined by Ottoman political theory and how these concepts related to the issue of legitimacy. The last section discusses how the Ottoman notions of legitimacy were exposed to criticism, discussion or simply to transformations in situations of crisis, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Series:

Edited by Ebru Boyar and Kate Fleet

Using a wealth of primary sources and covering the entire Ottoman period, Ottoman Women in Public Space challenges the traditional view that sees Ottoman women as a largely silent element of society, restricted to the home and not seen beyond the walls of the house or the public bath. Instead, taking women in a variety of roles, as economic and political actors, prostitutes, flirts and slaves, the book argues that women were active participants in the public space, visible, present and an essential element in the everyday, public life of the empire. Ottoman Women in Public Space thus offers a vibrant and dynamic understanding of Ottoman history.

Contributors are: Edith Gülçin Ambros, Ebru Boyar, Palmira Brummett, Kate Fleet and Svetla Ianeva.

Forging Urban Solidarities

Ottoman Aleppo 1640-1700

Series:

Charles Wilkins

As with most empires of the Early Modern period (1500-1800), the Ottomans mobilized human and material resources for warmaking on a scale that was vast and unprecedented. The present volume examines the direct and indirect effects of warmaking on Aleppo, an important Ottoman administrative center and Levantine trading city, as the empire engaged in multiple conflicts, including wars with Venice (1644-69), Poland (1672-76) and the Hapsburg Empire (1663-64, 1683-99). Focusing on urban institutions such as residential quarters, military garrisons, and guilds, and using intensively the records of local law courts, the study explores how the routinization of direct imperial taxes and the assimilation of soldiers to civilian life challenged – and reshaped – the city’s social and political order.

Ahmet Şeyhun

Islamist Thinkers in the Late Ottoman Empire and Early Turkish Republic offers an overview of the lives and ideas of thirteen influential Islamist thinkers. In the aftermath of the 1908 Revolution, Islamism became a prominent political ideology. In their writings, Islamist intellectuals analyzed and sought solutions to the social, economic and political issues of the empire. Their ideas constitute the blueprint for the Islamist-oriented political movements and parties that have been present in Turkish political life since the 1950s.

This book is an important contribution to the study of late Ottoman intellectual history and the field of Islamic/Turkish political studies. It makes available in English important primary sources to scholars and students who have no access to these materials in their original languages.

Empire, Islam, and Politics of Difference

Ottoman Rule in Yemen, 1849-1919

Series:

Thomas Kuehn

Historians of the Middle East in the long nineteenth century have often considered empire-building the preserve of European powers. This book revises this picture by exploring how the Ottomans re-conquered and ruled large parts of present-day Yemen between 1849 and the end of World War I, after more than two centuries of independence under local dynasties. Drawing on a wide range of sources and on recent scholarship on empire and colonialism Empire, Islam, and Politics of Difference shows how the concepts and practices of Ottoman imperial rule were shaped through the encounters between Ottoman officials, their European rivals, and local communities. The result is a fresh look at the nature of governance in the late Ottoman Empire more generally.

Seyyid Sa‘duddīn b. Mevlānā Maḥmūd b. Mevlānā Aḥmedüddīn b. Mevlānā Meḥmed eş-Şehīd eş-Şirvānī eş-Şekivānī ed-Dehnevī.

Completed in Şeki (at present also in Azarbeijan) before the Friday prayer of the last day of Z̲ī l-ḳa‘de or the first day of Z̲ī l-ḥicce of 993 (25 October 1585). Copy, probably an autograph, of a work on the Shirwān campaign. The copy seems to be unique; the work is not mentioned in Kātib

The Crimean Khanate and Poland-Lithuania

International Diplomacy on the European Periphery (15th-18th Century), A Study of Peace Treaties Followed by an Annotated Edition of Relevant Documents

Series:

Dariusz Kolodziejczyk

This is an extensive study, supplemented by an edition of relevant sources, of the diplomatic contacts between Poland-Lithuania and the Crimean Khanate between the early 15th and the late 18th century. It contains a chronology of mutual relations, a formal analysis of various types of documents, and a glimpse into the working of the Crimean chancery, where Genghisid and Islamic forms mixed with those borrowed from Christian Europe.
The book provides a fascinating insight into the intercultural exchange between Catholic Poland (with Latin and then Polish as the main chancery language) and predominantly Orthodox Lithuania (with Ruthenian as the main chancery language) on the one hand, and the Muslim Crimean Khanate (with Khwarezmian Turkic and then Ottoman Turkish as the main chancery language) on the other. It depicts Eastern Europe as a zone of contact, where the relations between Slavs and Tatars were by no means always hostile.