Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Social Sciences x
  • American Studies x

Economic Nationalism and Globalization

Lessons from Latin America and Central Europe

Series:

Henryk Szlajfer

In Economic Nationalism and Globalization: Lessons from Latin America and Central Europe Henryk Szlajfer offers, against the background of developments in Latin America (mainly Brazil) and Central Europe (mainly Poland) in times of first globalization from late 19th century until late 1930s, a reinterpretation of economic nationalism both as an analytical category and historical experience. Also, critically explored are attempts at proto-economic nationalism in early 19th century Poland and Latin America as well as links between economic nationalism and the emergence of integral political nationalism and authoritarianism.

Economic nationalism is interpreted as historically significant world-wide phenomenon intimately linked with the birth, development and crisis of capitalist modernity and as a response to underdevelopment under first globalization. Continuity of economic nationalism under present globalization is suggested.

Series:

Steve J. Shone

someone who does a completely different type of research. This situation has not been helped by the subfield’s persistence in presenting the history of ideas largely through the prism of a very small selection of white men chiefly from Athens, Rome, the United Kingdom, or the United States, a cast of

Series:

Steve J. Shone

, “Elizabeth Cady who?” None knew of the 1848 Seneca Convention or the Declaration of Sentiments; none knew about the National Woman Suffrage Association or the proposed 16th Amendment to grant women the right to vote first presented to Congress in 1878. None knew about The Woman’s Bible or Stanton’s great

Series:

Steve J. Shone

personally familiar with them, visited their office and reported the event for her publication, The Revolution , commenting that “[t]he advent of this woman firm in Wall Street marks a new era” ( Anthony 1870 , 154). Anthony’s present lack of acquaintance with the women who would later come to be seen by

Series:

Steve J. Shone

Tennie, which is why in the present book she has her own chapter, MacPherson, in claiming “first time” status forgets about Brough’s The Vixens , though it is included in her bibliography (2014, 329); moreover, no one has really reduced Tennie to a footnote – that is an exaggeration and, in fairness to

Series:

Steve J. Shone

Woodhull and Claflin’s Weekly , the organ of sisters and fellow free-love advocates Victoria C. Woodhull and Tennie C. Claflin, the subjects of earlier chapters. Waisbrooker also wrote short books and pamphlets in which she presented many of her political ideas, some of which took the form of novellas, one

Series:

Steve J. Shone

( Setouchi 1993 ). Although the present author is not proficient in the Japanese language, there now exist today sufficient translated materials about Itō Noe that it is possible to include a chapter here about her ideas, one of the purposes of which is to identify, for readers beyond Japan who will quite

Series:

Steve J. Shone

classical languages and authors, preparing him for his later legal studies at Harvard. Informally, Mercy derived great benefit from being present with her brother in Russell’s house, being able to access the minister’s library, and from her many conversations with Jemmy. Despite the significant

Series:

Steve J. Shone

Vladimir Korolenko ( Buhle 1988 , 15; Laslett 1993 , 23; Leeder 1993 , 8–9, 20, 22; Pesotta 1958 , 247–248). Like Itō Noe, Margaret Sanger, and Mollie Steimer, the subjects of prior chapters of the present volume, Pesotta was influenced by the leading anarchist, Emma Goldman. In Rose’s case, the

Series:

Steve J. Shone

demonstrated, Clayton eschewed due process in a number of different ways, disparaging the accused and editorializing in a negative way throughout the trial, expressing his own nativist perspective and criticizing anarchism as a doctrine, all the time presenting the defendants as persons who were not Americans