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say, there were a myriad of others, be they delegates, journalists, or local townspeople, who were present at the conference either officially or unofficially. In this complex multi-layered conference space, “sociability” worked like a social glue that brought people together and generated a semblance

In: Diplomatica

-Ray reconstructs a longue durée history from the Mughal era to the present day recounting how the legacy of the Mahabharat has underpinned every “Indian” administration. Whilst the Mughals, particularly Emperor Akbar, adapted to the Indian context and traditions, making themselves “Indian,” the British are

In: Diplomatica

wedding abstraction to sound, voice and movement by precise measures. Another dimension left in the background is design and production of musical instruments and its relation to IR as an industry (Gribenski, 173). Science of music may be unseen but is ever present just like the art and science of

In: Diplomatica

distinction is in order, as Professor Rasmussen suggests. Of course, it is relatively easy to agree on and present a common EU position in organizations related to functional topics, like, for instance, the World Intellectual Property Organization. An altogether different matter is to stand for them at the

In: Diplomatica

, therefore, employs a skillful analysis of large datasets drawn from decades of British diplomatic correspondence to come up with five principal mechanisms that govern private diplomatic exchanges. The main argument presented in the book is that the vast majority of the expectations that form through

In: Diplomatica

the diplomats who had experienced the 1919 Paris Peace Conference to eventually become a cliché of the histories of diplomacy until the 2000s, 2 so the history of international relations was presented as the inverted and positive image of the “old diplomatic history.” Robert Frank, holder of

In: Diplomatica

member governments and national bureaucracies themselves. In conclusion, and only more so because of these tensions, this is a welcome and highly illuminating book presenting an under-researched angle of io -history. The book’s target group – “specialists, teachers, undergraduate students” – is probably

In: Diplomatica

and credibly demonstrates how face-to-face diplomacy in his chosen cases influenced at least the timing and exact character of international developments. I would have wished for an editor, at the very least to correct mistakes like an inconsistent use of the present and past tenses and the fact that

In: Diplomatica

information on political issues and summaries of points presented in the main text – the function of which is not entirely clear. Thirdly, the book is highly normative. While reassessments may be fruitful, this book at times is more of a moral fable about Drummond’s virtues than a levelheaded historical

In: Diplomatica

influenced as its sixteenth and seventeenth-century predecessors by “the cultural turn” outside the realms of court culture broadly defined. 2 Having said this, diplomatic sources, perspectives and historians have had a considerable influence upon present-day depictions and perceptions of European

In: Diplomatica