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Being Human in the Ultimate

Studies in the Thought of John M. Anderson

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Edited by N. Georgopoulos and Michael Heim

For John M. Anderson philosophy, as the love of wisdom, is a concern for what is ultimate. The essays in this volume take to heart this understanding of philosophy, and are therefore responses to the ultimate. The first four essays by Kaelin, Schrag, Baillif and Johnstone, deal with Anderson's own account of ultimacy as it is presented in his reflections on the aesthetic occasion, the experience of the sublime, on freedom and on insight. The concern for what is ultimate is formulated differently by each of the other eight essays. Desmond articulates ways of our encounter with the ultimate by means of what he calls essential perplexity. Gendlin reflects on Aristotle's characterization of thinking as an activity that is ultimate. Biemel and Lingis present death as an aspect of the ultimate. Hersch sees our loss of meaning and value as the result of our refusal of finitude and thus of our denial of the ultimate which reveals itself in this finitude. Ginsberg initiates us into the ultimacy of the human encounter that is dialogue. Verene speaks of the ultimate through his account of the fool. For Kockelmans philosophy, unlike science, deals with what-is as it manifests itself in our encounter with our lived world which is a source of meaning, and in that sense an ultimate. Finally, John M. Anderson writes of the awareness of our becoming more than we are, and does so by bespeaking the origin of the dialogue we are.

Edited by Cosmin Sebastian Cercel and Cihan Ozpinar

The critical turn of the neoliberal capitalism in 2000s, 9/11 events and its after-effects, worldly and regional economic crises during the first decade of the 21st century and the repositioning of governments against crises… . The state has become one of the most burning questions of our times regarding its apparently rising power all over the world and it deserves even more attention today than any time.
The needed attention should awaken philosophical questionings as well: ‘Putting the state in its place’ cannot be considered out of ethics and oscillating discussions around the state between good and evil. This book aims to be a contribution to the debates as the volume gathers a number of contributions by scholars from around the world who discuss the state in this axis through various examples from different geographies and historical periods.

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Emmanuel Renault

in authors as diverse as Engels, Plekhanov, Korsch, Lukács and Marcuse 12 ). The early writings tend to be presented as a journey in the course of which Marx eventually reached his final philosophical position by combining various philosophical influences (primarily Hegel, Feuerbach, French

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Emmanuel Renault

Marx and Critical Theory examines Marx’s main philosophical, political and social theoretical ideas. Its purpose is twofold: making sense of the concepts and theses of Marx, and showing that they remain relevant for contemporary critical theory. Part One focuses on Marx’s conception of philosophy. Part Two analyses the Marxian primacy of the practical. Part Three is devoted to Capital and the critique of political economy. This book will be useful for those who want to deepen their understanding of Marx’s main ideas, as well as for those who want to clarify what is at stake in contemporary debates about the ways in which contemporary critical theory could or should refer to Marx.

Philosophy as Frustration

Happiness Found and Feigned from Greek Antiquity to the Present

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Bruce Silver

In Philosophy as Frustration: Happiness Found and Feigned from Greek Antiquity to Present Bruce Silver analyzes important views of happiness from Greek antiquity into the present. He argues that in many cases philosophers and positive psychologists do a poor job of defending the views of happiness they promote. Too often the philosophical approaches to what constitutes happiness are at odds with themselves and with possibilities for living happily. In some cases readers discover that the phrase “happy human being” is oxymoronic and that the most a person can expect is a life that is a measure of calm.

Work Values

Education, Organization, and Religious Concerns

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Edited by Samuel M. Natale, Brian M. Rothschild, Joseph W. Sora and Tara M. Madden

This book is an important contribution to the Values literature on the meanings of work. These essays explore the philosophical, ethical, religious, and social foundations that underscore so much of the current thinking and concern about work satisfaction and the place of work in the search of meaning. Various points of view are presented and these include among others historical perspectives, empirical studies and cross-cultural explorations. The result is a compelling and critical volume which challenges many basic cultural and empirical assumptions and raises many questions about values and value-based decisions.

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Edited by Nancy Billias

Evil is not only an abstract concept to be analyzed intellectually, but a concrete reality that we all experience and wrestle with on an ongoing basis. To truly understand evil we must always approach it from both angles: the intellective and the phenomenological. This same assertion resounds through each of the papers in this volume, in which an interdisciplinary and international group (including nurses, psychologists, philosophers, professors of literature, history, computer studies, and all sorts of social science) presented papers on cannibalism, the Holocaust, terrorism, physical and emotional abuse, virtual and actual violence, and depravity in a variety of media, from film to literature to animé to the Internet. Conference participants discussed villains and victims, dictators and anti-heroes, from 921 AD to the present, and considered the future of evil from a number of theoretical perspectives. Personal encounters with evil were described and analyzed, from interviews with political leaders to the problems of locating and destroying land mines in previous war zones. The theme of responsibility and thinking for the future is very much at the heart of these papers: how to approach evil as a question to be explored, critiqued, interrogated, reflected upon, owned. The authors urge an attitude of openness to new interpretations, new perspectives, new understanding. This may not be a comfortable process; it may in fact be quite disturbing. But ultimately, it may be the only way forward towards a truly ethical response. The papers in this collection provide a wealth of food for thought on this most important question.

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Edited by Thomas Magnell

The essays in Explorations of Value are drawn from work first presented at the 20th Conference of Value Inquiry. They are not mere records of conference presentations. The authors have reflected on their initial presentations. They have re-thought arguments in light of discussions at the conference. They have revised their work. All of this has combined to bring fresh ideas on important issues into carefully considered discussions. The nineteen authors of the essays do not share a common viewpoint on all problems of value inquiry. They are certainly not in agreement in their conclusions. Their concerns, however, cluster around a recognizable body of questions. Several of the authors raise fundamental questions on the nature of values and the possibility of giving them an objective status. Some of the authors raise questions about where value inquiry becomes value advocacy. They are also ready to ask whether or not advocacy is in the legitimate purview of philosophers. A number of authors set out to examine conditions of moral practice and of harming or benefiting people in general. Other authors show a concern for juxtaposing moral values and aesthetic values, in some cases to observe similarities, in some, differences. Finally, a few authors focus on particular notions such as forgiveness, intimacy, and love that are central to our lives.

Values, Work, Education

The Meanings of Work

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Edited by Samuel M. Natale, Brian M. Rothschild, Joseph W. Sora and Tara M. Madden

This book is a collection of reflections and empirical studies which examine the many facets of the meanings of work. The authors are significant scholars in fields of study ranging from ethics to sociology. The book is a text which aims at balancing the academic with the practical and so the chapters often reflect the tensions implicit in such a venture. The reader will find in these pages historical, philosophical, educational, religious, entrepreneurial and many other points of view which combine to emerge as a text which is both encyclopedic in information yet engaging and lively in style. The reader will be able to understand how the meanings of work have changed over the centuries varying according to historical place and point of view. At the same time, the diligent reader will observe the centrality that work has in the lives of people both practically and in terms of life quests. Work has previously been defined as an activity that produces something of value for other people. This definition does not even begin to include the information about work that is presented in this book. The reader will feel a invigorating sense of worth from this book.

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Elsa Peralta

For more than five centuries Portugal had large colonial dependencies. The end of the empire and the democratization of the country could not erase Portugal’s self-image as an imperial nation. The empire still stands as a prominent symbolic touchstone through which the national narrative was and still is built upon and sustained. Such collective representation of Portugal as an imperial maritime nation was ideologically fostered for centuries, slowly nurturing the representation of the Portuguese as peaceful, non-racist, gentler colonialists, and of their culture as universal, hybrid, somehow Creole, enriched by centuries of colonial contact. This chapter will explore several examples out of Portuguese past and present cultural discourses that testify to a continuity that runs through the universalistic, humanistic and multiculturalistic representation of Portuguese history and culture.