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"For Was I Not Born Here?"

Identity and Culture in the Work of Yvonne du Fresne

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Anne Holden Rønning

This study centres on the fiction of the New Zealand writer Yvonne du Fresne, the descendant of Danish and Danish-Huguenot families who emigrated to New Zealand in the late-nineteenth century and settled in the Manawatu area. It explores how memories of the past haunt generations of immigrants, and how issues of language, politics, and social norms live on through generations, affecting the formation of new identities and homes. Is it only, as with Astrid in Motherland, that by returning to our roots we can finally feel that we are at home in more than one country?
As Lauris Edmond writes, du Fresne’s work is a tapestry of the past and present, storying immigrant life. Flitting in and out of the past is shown to be one way of coming to terms with the present and of understanding the importance of home, as is evident in The Book of Ester and Frédérique, both centering on the manifold, complex European cultural traditions that were often overlooked in settler countries. Another is to be an inquisitive spy on the land like the child narrator, Astrid Westergaard, in du Fresne’s magnificent stories, many of them originally radio broadcasts, which depict life in a small Danish community in the Manawatu in the 1930s, often in a humorous and ironic manner.
Through her portrayal of fictional Scandinavian immigrants, du Fresne throws light on a relatively neglected area in New Zealand studies. Reading her writing against its reception shows how it raises issues of cultural colonization, stereotyping, and difference; the consequences of migration and exile taken up are, however, equally relevant in our global society of today, and expressive of transculturation in the globalized present.

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Martina Bross

Versions of Hamlet: Poetic Economy on Page and Stage takes a fresh look at an old textual problem: Instead of arguing the case for one of the three early Hamlet texts as »the one«, the book presents a new analytical approach which allows us to see different Hamlet versions and the interpretations emerging from them side by side.
Using a corpus which not only includes the three early printed texts but also 24 stage versions of the play, the book introduces an analytical method based on an assumption voiced by writers through the ages, namely that every part of a literary work belongs to a functional whole. Apart from making the relation between textual alterations and changing interpretations of the Hamlet texts visible, this study is the first to present a systematic overview of this principle of »poetic economy«.

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Edited by Sam Slote and Wim van Mierlo

Joyce's methods of composition have only recently begun to be examined in a rigorous fashion. Already the work done on the genesis of Joyce's texts has fostered both new insights and new questions regarding the overall status of his oeuvre. The conference Genitricksling Joyce, held at Antwerp in 1997, testified to the variety and vitality of genetic investigations into Joyce's work. We have tried to recreate this vitality in the present volume with a double purpose, or double trick. First, the essays collected in Genitricksling Joyce are not only indicative of the growing body of genetic scholarship, they also signify methodological and theoretical changes among its practitioners towards a more open form of discussion and understanding. Second, we hope that these essays will clearly demonstrate the relevance of genetic criticism to current critical and cultural concerns in Joyce studies.

In Black and Gold

Contiguous Traditions in Post-War British and Irish Poetry

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Edited by C.C. Barfoot

In Black and Gold indicates that opposed styles of poetry reveal subterranean correspondences that occasionally meet and run together. Austerity or tomfoolery are two of the many valid responses to the human condition that create the contiguous traditions that cannot help touching and reacting to each other. The poetry discussed in this book deals with the relation of individuals to strange or to familiar landscapes, and what this means to their own sense of displacement or rootedness; with the use of history as an escape from or as a challenge to an apparently failing present; and with the role of nationalism either as a refuge for angry frustration, or as a weapon against the affronting world, or as an ambivalent loyalty that needs to be scoured, or as all three. Here we find poetry as a means of discovering true or false allegiances and valid or invalid public and private identities; poetry as a medium for exploring the uses of the demotic in confronting the breakdowns and injustices of modern democracy; poetry as play in the midst of private and public woe; poetry as a spiritual quest, as a spiritual scourging, as a wrestling with spiritual absences; and poetry as an intermittent and sporadic commemoration of the triumphs and delights of epiphanic encounters with the physical world.

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VIKE MARTINA PLOCK

Abstract

This essay discusses two crucial medical subtexts in Joyce’s “Penelope”. As my argument will show, at the turn of the twentieth century gynaecological theory and domestic medicine both emerged as effective instruments in reinforcing conventional gender politics. In presenting Molly Bloom’s conflicting and kaleidoscopic image Joyce overtly challenges reductive representations of femininity and medicine’s growing influence in the society of modernity.

From Caxton to Beckett

Essays presented to W.H. Toppen on the occasion of his 70th birthday

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Edited by J.B.H. Alblas and Richard Todd

The Matter of Kings' Lives

The Design of Past and Present in the early fourteenth-century verse chronicles by Pierre de Langtoft and Robert Mannyng

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Thea Summerfield

The rhymed chronicles by Pierre de Langtoft and Robert Mannyng, written between c.1305 and 1338, form a unique pair in the history of English literature and historiography. Both were written in the North of England, both deal with the history of the kings of England from Brutus to the death of Edward I in July 1307. Yet the differences between them are significant. Langtoft wrote in Anglo-Norman with a specific purpose and a specific audience in mind. Robert Mannyng translated a large part of Langtoft's work into English for a very different kind of audience. Although he stayed close to his source-text in many places, his deviations offer insights into the way the English clergy and the public they addressed viewed themselves, their history and their future.
The Matter of Kings' Lives is of interest to social and political historians, especially those interested in the reign of Edward I and Anglo-Scottish relations, and to literary historians who may find that these works have more to offer than has hitherto been realized.

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Lilian Chaitas

Das literarische Feld sei ein Mikrokosmos des sozialen Wettbewerbs um Status und Prestige – so Pierre Bourdieu. Dementsprechend rücken zwangsläufig Strategien in den Fokus des Interesses, mittels derer sich Literaturproduzenten wie -rezipienten positionieren und die erkämpfte Position behaupten. Dieser Kampf wird bestimmt durch die Logik des Sich-Abgrenzens und Sich-Abhebens von anderen.
Als historisch breit angelegte Fallstudie des 20. Jahrhunderts zeichnet die vorliegende Untersuchung die im Feld der amerikanischen Lyrik vorherrschenden Machtkämpfe um (Be-)Deutungshoheit nach. Die Profilierung des Strategiebegriffs als zentrales Analyseinstrument ermöglicht es, einerseits Strategien der Selbstwahrnehmung und Selbstpositionierung und andererseits der Wahrnehmung und Positionierung von anderen Akteuren zu identifizieren. Distinktionsstrategien umfassen den Einsatz eines Arsenals von Kampfbegriffen, an denen sich der literarische Diskurs im Laufe des Jahrhunderts kontinuierlich unter sich verändernden literarhistorischen Vorzeichen abarbeitet.

Postcolonial Past & Present

Negotiating Literary and Cultural Geographies

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Edited by Anne Collett and Leigh Dale

In Postcolonial Past & Present twelve outstanding scholars of literature, history and visual arts look to those spaces Epeli Hau’ofa has insisted are full not empty, asking what it might mean to Indigenise culture. A new cultural politics demands new forms of making and interpretation that rethink and reroute existing cultural categories and geographies. These ‘makers’ include Mukunda Das, Janet Frame, Xavier Herbert, Tomson Highway, Claude McKay, Marie Munkara, Elsje van Keppel, Albert Wendt, Jane Whiteley and Alexis Wright. Case studies from Canada to the Caribbean, India to the Pacific, and Africa, analyse the productive ways that artists and intellectuals have made sense of turbulent local and global forces.

Contributors: Bill Ashcroft, Debnarayan Bandyopadhyay, Anne Brewster, Diana Brydon, Meeta Chatterjee—Padmanabhan, Anne Collett, Dorothy Jones, Kay Lawrence, Russell McDougall, Tekura Moeka’a, Tony Simões da Silva, Teresia Teaiwa, Albert Wendt, Lydia Wevers, Diana Wood Conroy

Back to the Present: Forward to the Past, Volume II

Irish Writing and History since 1798

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Edited by Patricia A. Lynch, Joachim Fischer and Brian Coates

The island of Ireland, north and south, has produced a great diversity of writing in both English and Irish for hundreds of years, often using the memories embodied in its competing views of history as a fruitful source of literary inspiration. Placing Irish literature in an international context, these two volumes explore the connection between Irish history and literature, in particular the Rebellion of 1798, in a more comprehensive, diverse and multi-faceted way than has often been the case in the past. The fifty-three authors bring their national and personal viewpoints as well as their critical judgements to bear on Irish literature in these stimulating articles. The contributions also deal with topics such as Gothic literature, ideology, and identity, as well as gender issues, connections with the other arts, regional Irish literature, in particular that of the city of Limerick, translations, the works of Joyce, and comparisons with the literature of other nations. The contributors are all members of IASIL (International Association for the Study of Irish Literatures). Back to the Present: Forward to the Past. Irish Writing and History since 1798 will be of interest to both literary scholars and professional historians, but also to the general student of Irish writing and Irish culture.