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Edited by Freda Chapple and Chiel Kattenbelt

Intermediality: the incorporation of digital technology into theatre practice, and the presence of film, television and digital media in contemporary theatre is a significant feature of twentieth-century performance. Presented here for the first time is a major collection of essays, written by the Theatre and Intermediality Research Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, which assesses intermediality in theatre and performance. The book draws on the history of ideas to present a concept of intermediality as an integration of thoughts and medial processes, and it locates intermediality at the inter-sections situated in-between the performers, the observers and the confluence of media, medial spaces and art forms involved in performance at a particular moment in time. Referencing examples from contemporary theatre, cinema, television, opera, dance and puppet theatre, the book puts forward a thesis that the intermedial is a space where the boundaries soften and we are in-between and within a mixing of space, media and realities, with theatre providing the staging space for intermediality. The book places theatre and performance at the heart of the ‘new media’ debate and will be of keen interest to students, with clear relevance to undergraduates and post-graduates in Theatre Studies and Film and Media Studies, as well as the theatre research community.

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Edited by David Francis Urrows

The twelve essays presented in this volume are drawn from the Fifth International Conference on Word and Music Studies held at Santa Barbara, CA, in 2005. The conference was organized and sponsored by The International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA) and in its central section explored the theme of “Word/Music Adaptation”. In these wide-ranging papers, a great variety of cases of intermedial transposition between music, literature, drama and film are examined. The music of Berlioz, Biber, Chopin, Carlisle Floyd, Robert Franz, Bernard Herrmann, Liszt, Richard Strauss, Verdi, and pop singer Kate Bush confronts and commingles with the writings of Emily Brontë, Goethe, Nancy Huston, George Sand, and Shakespeare in these cutting-edge adaptation studies. In addition, four films are discussed: Wuthering Heights, Fedora, Otello, and The Notebook. The articles collected will be of interest not only to music and literary scholars, but also to those engaged in the study of adaptation theory, semiotics, literary criticism, narrative theory, art history, feminism or postmodernism.

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Edited by Işil Baş and Donald C. Freeman

Challenging the Boundaries seeks to transcend the limits of literary genres and national cultures, exploring both old and new frontiers in language and literature from an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, and challenging perspective. Selected from the pathbreaking Istanbul conference of the Poetics and Linguistics Association, these papers treat topics ranging from contemporary neurobiology’s insights into the sources of poetic creativity to the cultural theories of Michel Foucault and Hélène Cixous and their literary consequences; from the films of the American director David Lynch to those of the Senegalese artist Djibril Diop Mambéty; from the work of the Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk to James Joyce’s Ulysses and the stories of Virginia Woolf. This volume will be of particular interest to readers who might wish to become acquainted with the work of able young scholars from an exceptionally wide array of academic cultures and theoretical commitments. The authors whose essays appear in Challenging the Boundaries reflect in their approaches and subjects both the breadth and depth of the international academic community. PALA Papers is a series of volumes comprising essays selected and edited from presentations at the annual conferences of the Poetics and Linguistics Association, an international body of scholars whose work focuses on the interdisciplinary nexus of linguistics, discourse theory, and literary analysis, criticism, and theory. Each volume will present studies that provide models to scholars throughout the world for conducting their own research in this multidisciplinary paradigm on such topics as, among many others, close linguistic analysis of canonical literary works, corpus-based studies of literary narrative, and the linguistic basis of contemporary social and cultural theory.

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Nina Nørgaard

Through analyses of selected passages from James Joyce’s Ulysses, this article demonstrates how the challenging of the boundaries between linguistics and literary studies can be more than a one-way process aimed at uncovering linguistic patterns of literary texts. The theoretical basis of the article is Halliday & Hasan’s concept of cohesion as presented in Cohesion in English (1976). While demonstrating the usefulness of Halliday & Hasan’s approach in literary analysis by uncovering aspects of Joyce’s extensive use of cohesion as a meaning-making resource, the application of their approach to Joyce’s novel at the same time points to useful adjustments of the concept. It is thus argued that just like more regular examples of synonymy proper, metaphorical relations between lexical items that are usually semantically far apart are cohesive, too, as are ties that stretch over considerably longer passages than those typically considered in analyses of cohesion. While arguing for certain extensions of Halliday & Hasan’s cohesive categories, the article simultaneously acknowledges and discusses methodological problems involved in such extensions and furthermore considers the upper and lower limits of cohesion.

Understanding Knowledge Creation

Intellectuals in Academia, the Public Sphere and the Arts

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Edited by Nikita Basov and Oleksandra Nenko

Understanding Knowledge Creation: Intellectuals in Academia, the Public Sphere and the Arts brings together scholars from a wide range of disciplines and cultures and involves them into a multi-dimensional dialogue on the mechanisms of knowledge creation in the present-day society with a specific focus on intellectuals as knowledge creators in three main arenas of their activity: the ‘institutionalized’ arena - academia - and two adjacent arenas: the public sphere and the arts.

Art et littérature

Le voyage entre texte et image

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Edited by Jean-Loup Korzilius

Les voyages relatés dans le présent volume sont en effet fortement associés aux dimensions visuelle et scripturale en ce qu’ils se fondent sur, engendrent ou passent par l’écriture et/ou la figuration, que ce soit simultanément ou consécutivement : le voyage vers des contrées mystérieuses et déroutantes de Marco Polo, dans l’hypermonde, une campagne militaire…, le voyage formateur…, celui entrepris pour raisons pratiques ou intellectuelles…, pour s’adonner à une nostalgie improbable …, au rêve d’ une communauté idéale…, ou pour se confronter à l’étrangeté du lieu visité.
En considérant les échanges variés et serrés entre les deux modes d’expression, le rapport texte/image apparaît dans la perspective du voyage comme la métaphore de l’expérience même du voyage au sens profond du terme.
Cet aspect (trans)formateur du voyage est donc au cœur du présent recueil (…) Comme dans la vie de ces voyageurs, un réseau nouveau, invisible se crée sous l’effet du déplacement entre la lettre et la forme, entre ce qui était au départ inaccessible, ignoré ou impensable et le connu ou convenu…
Il ne reste plus qu’ à souhaiter qu’en voyageant d’un texte à l’autre, d’une illustration à l’autre, d’une ambiance historique et imaginaire à l’autre, le lecteur saisisse, lui aussi, l’occasion de circuler entre les diverses configurations du dialogue visuel/scriptural… (et) entre l’histoire, l’histoire de la littérature, de l’art, la littérature comparée et l’esthétique graphique.

Orientations

Space / Time / Image / Word

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Edited by Claus Clüver, Véronique Plesch and Leo H. Hoek

Based on papers presented at the Fifth Triennial Conference of the International Association of Word and Image Studies (IAWIS/AERTI) held in 2002 in Hamburg, the twenty-two essays in this volume cover a wide array of intermedial relations and a great variety of media, from medieval architecture to interactive digital art. They have been arranged in sections labeled “History and Identity,” “Cultural Memory,” “Texts and Photographs: Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Memory,” “Mixed-Media Texts: Cartography in Contemporary Art and Fiction,” “Mixed-Media Texts: ‘Yellow-Cover Books’, Artists' Books, and Comics,” “Intermedia Texts: Logotypes,” and “Space, Spatialization, Virtual Space.” Displaying a range of methods and interests, these contributions by scholars from Europe, the United States, and South America working in different disciplines confirm the impression voiced by IAWIS president Charlotte Schoell-Glass in her introduction that “the influence of Visual and Cultural Studies has changed the outlook of many who study the interactions of texts and images”.

A Nation of Victims?

Representations of German Wartime Suffering from 1945 to the Present

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Edited by Helmut Schmitz

The re-emergence of the issue of wartime suffering to the fore of German public discourse represents the greatest shift in German memory culture since the Historikerstreit of the 1980s. The (international) attention and debates triggered by, for example, W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, Günter Grass’s Im Krebsgang, Jörg Friedrich’s Der Brand testify to a change in focus away from the victims of National Socialism to the traumatic experience of the ‘perpetrator collective’ and its legacies. The volume brings together German, English and Israeli literary and film scholars and historians addressing issues surrounding the representation of German wartime suffering from the immediate post-war period to the present in literature, film and public commemorative discourse. Split into four sections, the volume discusses the representation of Germans as victims in post-war literature and film, the current memory politics of the Bund der Vertriebenen, the public commemoration of the air raids on Hamburg and Dresden and their representation in film, photography, historiography and literature, the impact and reception of W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, the representation of flight and expulsion in contemporary writing, the problem of empathy in representations of Germans as victims and the representation of suffering and National Socialism in Oliver Hirschbiegel’s film Der Untergang.

Media for All

Subtitling for the Deaf, Audio Description, and Sign Language

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Edited by Jorge Díaz Cintas, Pilar Orero and Aline Remael

This book, a first in its kind, offers a survey of the present state of affairs in media accessibility research and practice. It focuses on professional practices which are relative newcomers within the field of audiovisual translation and media studies, namely, audio description for the blind and visually impaired, sign language, and subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing for television, DVD, cinema, internet and live performances.
Thanks to the work of lobbying groups and the introduction of legislation in some countries, media accessibility is an area that has recently gained marked visibility in our society. It has begun to appear in university curricula across Europe, and is the topic of numerous specialised conferences.
The target readership of this book is first and foremost the growing number of academics involved in audiovisual translation at universities – researchers, teachers and students – but it is also of interest to the ever-expanding pool of practitioners and translators, who may wish to improve their crafts. The collection also addresses media scholars, members of deaf and blind associations, TV channels, and cinema or theatre managements who have embarked on the task of making their programmes and venues accessible to the visually and hearing impaired.